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Dickinson Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport Manager Matthew Remynse, right, discusses progress of a new hangar project with Robert Zent, center, and Thomas Reichert during an Airport Authority Commission meeting on Friday morning at the airport.

Airport wants to expand hangar

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News Dickinson,North Dakota 58602
The Dickinson Press
Airport wants to expand hangar
Dickinson North Dakota 1815 1st Street West 58602

The Dickinson Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport is looking to make a new hangar project bigger after airport officials realized the opportunity for a great deal on construction during an Airport Authority Commission meeting Friday morning at the airport.


A project for an additional aircraft storage facility originally planned to be 100 feet by 100 feet may be expanded by 2,000 square feet.

Airport Manager Matt Remynse said there was one bid to construct the proposed smaller structure for about $765,000. Adding the additional space would be about $70,000, which seemed like a good buy, multiple commissioners said.

However, the original budget was for $810,000, so adding the space would put the project over budget, Remynse said. However, it might be too good of a deal to pass up, Commissioner Thomas Reichert said.

"That last 20 feet per square foot is pretty cheap, real cheap," he said.

Remynse said the airport is waiting to hear about funding from Stark County Development, Billings and Dunn counties and the city of Dickinson.

Commission Chairman Jon Frantsvog said the commission must consider both options even while waiting for additional funding because the expansion seems to be a great bargain.

"There are a lot of holes that have to be plugged here, but the analysis has to be concurrent with both configurations because that is the cheapest you will ever get that additional square footage," he said.

Remynse said that having the hangar in operation would be a net gain of about $4,000 in 2012.

The hangar will use either a bifold door of sliding doors, both of which have their advantages, Remynse said.

Construction can move forward after an abandoned civil air traffic building is demolished, Remynse said, which is expected to be complete next week.