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The windows of the Historic Elks Building in downtown are adorned with Christmas paintings in this Wednesday photo.

As Elks deadline nears, stop work order still posted

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News Dickinson,North Dakota 58602 http://www.thedickinsonpress.com/sites/default/files/styles/square_300/public/fieldimages/32/1024/copy-0623-elks-4.jpg?itok=RrtbTxQ-
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As Elks deadline nears, stop work order still posted
Dickinson North Dakota 1815 1st Street West 58602

Renovations on the Historic Elks Building in downtown Dickinson must be complete in a week from today and yet the stop work order was still posted on the front door Wednesday.

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Granville Brinkman has been in charge of the project and is on his fifth extension. Though the building still has exposed beams and wiring, he said he has a plan. Brinkman told Dickinson City Commission members at Monday's meeting at City Hall that his debts will be paid off, he is selling the building and construction can be done in about six months.

But Mayor Dennis Johnson is leery.

"I am interested in finding an alternative to Brinkman," Johnson said Wednesday. "Yes, Brinkman had a suggestion of a new developer but the commissioners don't know much about him, as with any new developer we need to get more info about him and find out if he is qualified and is a good fit for the project."

Brinkman, of Tacoma, Wash., a managing member of the Dickinson Elks Building and president of New Care Construction, attended Monday's meeting with a project update.

Brinkman said he presented a letter to City Administrator Shawn Kessel on Friday and is working with Tim Quigg of Quigg International, LLC, who would like to purchase the building.

Brinkman said the plan is similar to the one he presented earlier, adding the third floor will be used by Quigg, the second by law firm Ebeltoft Sickler Kolling Grosz Bouray, PLLC, the first floor will be a restaurant and the lower level a spa.

He told the commission he would like 45 days to get a plan together.

Brinkman purchased the building from the city in 2005 and a 2007 fire gutted it causing delays in the project. The city has given Brinkman five extensions to complete the project with the latest deadline of June 30, according to Press articles.

If approved, the extension would be Brinkman's sixth. He has been working on the project for nearly a decade and is also allegedly indebted hundreds of thousands of dollars to contractors, according to previous Press articles. The city issued a stop work order in March because Brinkman failed to pay a $4,227 building permit.

Quigg, of Tacoma, said his family has been in business since 1895, they focus on heavy civil construction, oil terminal and refinery business.

Quigg has several projects in Williston including Dakota Oil Processing and a building near the airport. His website emphasizes his dream of "Building the Bakken."

"Epic what's going on here," Quigg said at the meeting. "I want to be a part of it, do it right and be part of something that will be of value to the community."

Quigg said he assumes the debt and leans against the building and the unpaid vendors who have worked on the building will be paid.

"I'm putting enough money for it. I'm assuming they will be paid, right Beaver," Quigg asked. "That's why I have good council I don't have all those answers right here but I am assuming they will all be current...they better be."

Johnson and Commissioner Klayton Oltmanns said the primary concern is that all debt and leans will be cleared up and construction will be completed though the transaction.

Quigg said he had no previous dealings with Brinkman before this business venture, but added he has seen some of Brinkman's work and was impressed.

"The best thing would be for the building to transition to a developer who is capable of all this," Johnson said. "It would be good for the building, city and past and present developers."

The commission wants to seek legal advice before moving forward.

City Commission members also approved a contract with the firm Greenwood and Ramsey to advise them on matters relating to the Historic Elks Building because their regular law firm Ebeltoft Sickler Kolling Grosz Bouray, PLLC, had a conflict of interest in regards to the matter.

"We need to clearly understand our legal rights and obligations concerning the project," Johnson said.

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