Sections

Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement

Owner, investigators seek answers in shooting of horse

Email Sign up for Breaking News Alerts
News Dickinson,North Dakota 58602 http://www.thedickinsonpress.com/sites/all/themes/thedickinsonpress_theme/images/social_default_image.png
The Dickinson Press
(701) 225-4205 customer support
Owner, investigators seek answers in shooting of horse
Dickinson North Dakota 1815 1st Street West 58602

COOPERSTOWN – Kim Damsgard has been blaming herself since finding her horse Buckskin lying half frozen in a pond an hour south of here Tuesday morning, shot through the neck.

Advertisement
Advertisement
0 Talk about it

“I feel like there’s something I could have done,” Damsgard said. “Like I should have driven out there Sunday. But I’m a hospice nurse, and I have patients dying.”

Sunday was the last time anyone saw Buckskin alive. Damsgard boarded the 3- to 4-year-old Palomino-quarterhorse mix with Scott Henderson, who lives near Enderlin. Henderson’s son, Tanner, saw Buckskin that day.

Both Hendersons and Damsgard have spent many hours mourning since then.

“Somebody shot my baby,” Damsgard said. “I don’t think I’ve ever cried so much in my life.”

A Cass County Sheriff’s Department detective is investigating the shooting, said Cass County Sgt. Tara Morris.

The detective is also investigating a separate open case of three or four cattle that were reported shot within the past month in Cass County, Morris said.

Morris said they don’t believe the two cases are related because the cattle shooting appears to have been done at closer range, and looks more deliberate.

Damsgard suspects a hunter may have mistaken the buckskin-colored horse for a deer. Deer-hunting season opened in the state Friday.

She’s considered offering a reward for information leading to charges against the culprit, but investigators are worried doing so will produce false leads from the public.

Investigators plan to take a metal detector to the area today to see if they can recover a slug.

Damsgard said she’s not just concerned about getting justice for Buckskin.

The horse fell 200 yards from a house, well within range of potential harm to humans from a stray bullet.

“The land was posted,” she said. “Nobody, for any reason, had any business shooting in there.”

Advertisement
Emily Welker
(701) 241-5541
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness