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You Said It: Reader comments from the Press survey

More than 500 readers who participated in The Dickinson Press Reader Survey left comments in one of two comment sections. Here is a look of what some of them had to say. First names, last initials and cities were used for readers who left their information. The reader’s sex and age group are used to describe those who filled out their surveys anonymously. Some grammatical errors may appear in comments because they are taken directly from survey responses. A small sampling of these comments were randomly chosen to appear in The Dickinson Press Sunday print edition on Page A9.

“It has brought more retail, but also more crime.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“Our city isn’t as attractive as it wa before all the oil came into southwest North Dakota.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“They always say there’s more jobs and big money, but the beauty of the landscape is being ruined, all at the expense of crowded living and tearing up the land.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“It is full of new people who are friendly and outgoing. It is no longer the nasty, xenophobic little village of nine years ago -- there are actually some energetic and interesting people here now.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“I’m tired of rude, dangerous people, being flipped off and disrespected by both old and young -- mostly young.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Dickinson is doing way better than any other town in North Dakota dealing with oil.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“We are attracting nothing but crime, drug dealers and murder -- we have man camp housing in our residential districts.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“The people coming in to southwest North Dakota and Dickinson have no respect for North Dakota residents or our property. Just look around you, it’s unreal!”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“Having grown up near Dickinson and now moved back, (I) am grateful that the choice was made to live in the country. The family life has eroded. The next generation will hurt as a result.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“We need to develop the oil industry, but getting there is a mess.”

Sandy F., Dickinson

“I think the city is going a good job with infrastructure, but we also need the south side to grow.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“The greed of success has overshadowed the good that could be considered good for our people.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Too much building. This area will eventually become an ‘industrial wasteland’ with a lot of vacant buildings and a decreased population.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Good for those who make oilfield wages but bad for those of us who don’t.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“To (sic) much greed! It’s all about the money to some!! High, high rent cost! It’s all about money here.”

Anonymous female, age 19-25

“Please no more banks, bars, hotels, motels, apt. buildings. Need more affordable housing for the less fortunate.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Greed and competition are rampant. Not all people are making oil money or work with the industry. Dickinson is a nightmare. Traffic is horrible -- no stop lights, crime is ugly, drugs, lots of not nice people. It’s all about money. Safety of the people is not there.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“Almost every aspect of my life has been affected in a negative way.”

Anonymous male, age 80 or older

“Money has become more important than caring for people.”

Anonymous female, age 80 or older

“Plan to leave here due to changes.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Most of the area north and west of Dickinson is just ruined.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“I believe the city leaders are headed in the right direction to improve quality of life in Dickinson.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“We’ll never see North Dakota again as we remember it a few years ago.  Too much construction and drilling oil destroyed very much of our beautiful, natural landscape.”

Anonymous male, age 80 or older

“The oil has no doubt left it’s mark on Dickinson but we need to remember to keep our North Dakota ethics and values and know not everyone with or without an oil field job can afford our cost of living.”

Savannah H., Dickinson

“Traffic -- something needs to be done with the lights on the north side of Dickinson.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“It is somewhat scary because I don’t know what the future holds for my grandchildren and great-grandchildren.”

Claire H., Richardton

“My biggest concern is the rate at which we are growing; planning for growth/traffic --safety. Miss a bit of “small town” atmosphere that seems to be ending. Concerns for environment too.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Becoming acquainted with other cultures is educational, helps build a world community, but the increase of crime is definitely a negative.

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“City commission is too optimistic about growth! Slow down -- be cautious. Listen to older residents!”

George N., Dickinson

“It never will be the friendly, safe community with neighbors caring for each other like it was back in the 1950s and ‘60s.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“Life for the retired person is tough and getting worse for fixed incomes.”

Edith N., Dickinson

“Have lived in Dickinson 50 years. Leaving the area because of the negative effects of the oil boom. Wanted to retire here but can’t afford to.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Inflated home values are unrealistic. Wasteful and expensive spending by the city while our taxes and fees increase.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“When I go back to visit, they have less time for me (my family) because of the long hours of working and there is less people in church now. So what is right? In other words, good, big things are not always right.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Out of staters are here for the money, not the long term effect this has on our region and heritage. We also need a homeless shelter and lower property taxes.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“If the oil boom goes bust, what will happen to all those new buildings going up all over town?”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“It’s about time something good has come to western N.D.”

Alvin W., Hettinger

“New help that don’t take care of their customers and are rude to people.”

Anonymous female, age 80 or older

“Due to lack of local people who want to work, many ethnic groups have moved in, which is both good and bad.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Our neighborhood is not quiet like it was. My wife and I don’t feel safe going to the stores.”

Mark F., Dickinson

“Too much greed in people. Everyone wants to get in on the money coming in. Trying to get rich overnight. No thoughts about retired people who have no oil money coming in. Even restaurants and others raised their prices. Not reasonable.”

Vicki K., Dickinson

“A person used to feel pretty safe, but that’s not true anymore. Being an older person and on a fixed income, it’s really hard to imagine what will happen in the next few years.”
Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Regular residents are paying higher prices for the majority of everything -- not all have oil checks.”

Phyllis H., Dickinson

“More money in the area, good people moving here. More crime, drugs, undesirable people. We miss the farming, the beauty of the crops, etc. We liked the small town.”

Anonymous female, age 80 or older

“The increased population has but a strain on city resources but seeing and talking to many people who come for jobs because of hardships in their area means we should be thankful for jobs.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“In future years, local taxpayers will be on the hook to maintain infrastructure and clean up after the boom. The last boom was never supposed to die, but it did and this one will too!”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Like the job opportunities but my experience has (sic) out-of-state companies did not want to hire local. The out-of-state people are rude drivers.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“Too many construction and asphault scammers from out of state with great salesmen -- don’t worry, they will be gone when their work falls apart!!! Shop local!”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“More and more garbage in the ditches, streets, neighborhoods. Can Dickinson keep up with sewer, water, etc.? Horrible traffic lock up.”

Michaela D., Dickinson

“Dickinson and surrounding area is becoming just another mining town … ugly!”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“Some of these people moving in need to stay away.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Good for businesses and wealthy people. Bad for ordinary retired citizens. Sorry to see our good farm and ranch land being turned into industry.”

Richard W., Dickinson

“We need more oil-impact funding for Dickinson State. Surplus is at an all-time high and yet our legislators won’t even fight for us for more funding for schools, etc.! Our taxes continue to go up to keep paying for things like new school buildings.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“It has brought job opportunities for many, brought new business development, but has also brought crime, drugs, prostitution to this area! Even though there has been positive impact and opportunities galore, I think SW ND looks and feels like a new industrial dirty looking area. Doesn’t have that small home type feel anymore.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“We need to further prepare for the growth of Dickinson. Our services are not adequate. Zoning should be improved.”

Dorothy K., Dickinson

“It could be worse. We will survive.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“I am very upset at the loss of established tree rows (new mall area west of town). People do not realize how hard it is to grow trees here. I dislike all the dust and noise SW of town. Very dangerous on country roads. This is still a potential danger of getting emergency care south of RR (railroad) tracks if BN is moving oil cars from the RR … block the road up to 60 minutes at a time.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“I think Dickinson is handling growth better than any other city in SW ND.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“After 68 years in SW N.D. (Dunn and Stark) we are making plans to leave -- join the hundreds who have already left. Our governor and Lynn Helms have ruined this state beyond help.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“... multiple families in one residence, most not paying taxes or contributing to the city. No pride by the out of state people. The care less.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“Who has time to look at the landscape. Traffic is atrocious; drivers don’t follow rules of the road; roads and streets are awful -- pot holes, etc.”

Cindi D.

“People at City Hall and on the City Commission need to become more responsible and give up corruption.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Greedy landlords that like to collect rent, but do not maintain their property. I.E. uncut grass, 5-6 pickups per rental, vehicles parked on boulevards.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“Oil business and traffic is driving old people out of their homes. Prices too high for college students. More crime. No. Dak. people getting greed for money, taking advantage of high prices.”

Roger F., Manning.

“Dickinson is not the same. I hate it now”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“It's brought life to our towns that would be gone in a generation or two. On top of that the pay is great and has helped raise wages across the board.”

Nate R., Glen Ullin

“All the building scares me, when this boom goes bust who is going to take care of all these empty buildings so out town doesn't look like crap!!!”

Anonymous male, age 26-34

“You wouldn't have this survey if you didn't know there was a problem in Dickinson.  However, there is no solution so c'est la vie.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“I love that we are getting new retail and restaurant options coming to town. It is also nice to have a strong economy. But, speaking specifically for young couples who have hopes of starting lives and planting roots in Dickinson, the energy industry is making it very difficult to be able to afford living here.”

Anonymous female, age 19-25

“It is good for the current economy, but we have blinded ourselves with ignorance that this "boom" will come to an end and people leave the area.”

Anonymous male, age 19-25

“The traffic is so very aggravating! the waiting lines at Walmart are ridiculous! I am thankful Menards chose to build here and I am hopeful one day we will have some shopping choices. There has been good and there has been bad - unfortunately the bad has been really bad.”

Rhonda D., Dickinson

“I feel it's a good thing for all this construction to be happening. We are a rapidly growing city and more people, means higher need for homes and more choices to shop. I feel as if the oil industry is sort of ‘updating’ or ‘renewing’ this area.”

Anonymous male, age 19-25

“This biggest outrage to me is the rents that are being charged to people in Dickinson. Even the oil workers can't afford the prices. They pack four people in these apartments. What are people thinking? The price of groceries is another concern.”

Jean F., Dickinson

“I would be happy if all went away today and we had our little town back. Staying here keeps getting harder and harder. Not everyone has an energy related wage.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“Unplanned, unregulated, under funded and price gouging local merchants. It has brought out the worst I people and destroyed the peace and lifestyle of the community.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Just hate to see us lose the last frontier but we are all gaining financially because of it.  A lot of other areas would trade places with us in a heartbeat!”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“When I moved to Dickinson people were bemoaning the oil bust and loss of jobs, people, employment, etc. Now that it's back we have a great opportunity to develop our town into what we can envision for the future. Our city, school and park district leaders are doing a tremendous job dealing with the change and transition that our community is experiencing. While this energy development cycle has brought some negatives, the positives far outweigh them.”

Kris F., Dickinson

“Dickinson is being forced to ‘grow up.’ We've always been somewhat of an adolescent town -- small when we want to be small, big when we want to be big. Now, we are faced with big town problems and we are having to face them as a big town must. It's a good thing.”

Deb N., Dickinson

“Dickinson has grown too fast without taking care of traffic needs to handle the growth.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“All the growth and people and they send their money back home wherever that is. Also, the homeless shelter issue. We don't want them here.”

Dave O., Dickinson

“You have to have a lot of patience to live in Dickinson. The service and price paid at restaurants, grocery stores (wal-mart esp) is terrible. The city doesn't seem like they want to fix any traffic problems in the city.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“Some of the construction companies are building garbage for people to live in, and we still can't afford it.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Communities that are working quickly to grow and offer more services to the people are doing well. Roads and traffic flow and control are a must. Dickinson is a pain to get around in anymore. Small communities and town roads/streets are awful. We need grocery stores. EconoFoods is bad, Walmart is bad but cheaper. Shopping, food and roads = essential for community happiness.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“My family has moved away and this summer most of my friends are moving out of the area. I am tired of the newcomer's with the bad attitudes telling me how horrible ND is to live in. The city of Dickinson is a mess and I only see it getting worse as time goes on. I am financially better off now, but it's just not worth it anymore. The city needs to get more recreational activities, trails, parks, etc. Dickinson has to be one of the worst cities in the midwest for recreational opportunities and entertainment activities.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“Those with jobs in the energy industry who are well paid can afford to live here. The rest of us face high prices on a limited income. The beauty of the prairie land has been destroyed with oil well sites, roads, flares, industrial dust, and our streets are dirty as commercial trucks coming in from rural areas drop their mud, dirt,and clay everywhere.”

Anonymous male, age 65-79

“I worry about the quality of housing being built. I wonder when the city will quit letting people build apartment buildings. I worry about the quality of the people that keep coming to Dickinson to find jobs, and don't get jobs or have places to live. I worry about the service industry, finding good employees and keeping them.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Dickinson used to be a nice place to live. We moved away last year when it became apparent that oil traffic had taken over the whole town. The stores are always crowded with very little left on the shelves. Prices of goods have risen some and I see that getting worse. Housing and apartment rentals are way out of line with the rest of the U.S. Infrastructure for rising population is not there. The city can't keep up and is spending way too fast to keep everything on track. Many projects are in the planning stages costing the taxpayers millions of dollars. When is it going to stop?”

Mike W., Minnesota

“This place is really booming and its great to be a part of it, I help set the pumpjacks in the field those will be here for a long time, some locals who have been here their whole life and on fixed income have to leave because of the high rent thats sad, this rent is a serious issue we are getting ripped off and i wish there was a law against this!”

Jesse E., Dickinson

“Alot of greed has happened with growth in area. And crime, mistrust and disrespect of property has also gone up. Not all crime makes the news. Southwest and Dickinson doesn't want what Williston and Watford City has. The oil money some get including me is not worth the trade off of the good quality of life we once had. Also more people mean less deer applications available and lakes are crowded with people which is important to me. Alot more to say but don't want to bore you more!”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Although the oil boom has certainly benefited the state and Dickinson from an economic standpoint, there has been a price to pay for all of the development in such a short period of time. Before the oil boom, Dickinson was a nice, relatively quiet town with enough services to provide a good quality of life at a reasonable cost. This has changed. The town has become crowded with traffic and has become a sprawling city of new housing and apartments. Crime has increased and the cost of living has risen. The countryside in the Bakken play has been reduced to an oil recovery unit at the expense of wildlife and the landscape. I think southwest North Dakota is being sacrificed for oil profits and the area is rapidly becoming like an exploited third world country. The state government has pledged to help alleviate the impact but is continually a day late and a dollar short. I would move away from Dickinson except for the fact that I have friends and relatives in town including grandkids. The oil boom needs to slow down and more proactive planning needs to take place so that Dickinson does not become a Bakersfield, CA or West Texas oil desert. We need to ensure that Dickinson will be a good place to live for our children and that southwest North Dakota remains the most scenic part of our state for future generations to enjoy.”

Rich B., Dickinson

“Terrible, can't wait to find a way out of this hell hole of a town that I once LOVED!”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Dickinson is quickly headed towards a place where the middle class disappears. This will spell an end to the small businesses and possibly even the college as middle income families (especially new ones into the community) find it more and more difficult to find places to live.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“It is what it is.”

Anonymous male, age 19-25

“I would like to thank all the new people moving to our area. That’s what it takes to make a community prosper. Know it’s up to our community to make this a place where people want to live and bring their families.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“I grew up in Dickinson, and it has changed dramatically. For me, it's mostly good things. I love the new stores and restaurants and development going on. I think there are people coming here bringing violence that we haven't had before. But theres always bad that comes with the good. And the violence is nothing worse than other towns that are larger. So i think if people want the new development, they have to accept the violence as well.”
Anonymous female, age 19-25

“Changing too fast. Can't keep up with all the necessities that a city requires -- too many to name. Too many of the changes are a detriment to the ordinary person who is not cashing in on the oil boom. Too many money grabbers not taking into account the ordinary person.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“This is the first time in my life that I haven't felt safe in this town. We live on the outskirts of town and there is no patrolling of that area even with the increased crime in the city and surrounding areas. The roads by our house are thrashed because of the truck traffic yet we continue to pay our taxes for their upkeep. Even with decent paying jobs it seems impossible to get ahead because of the increased prices in everything. Now we have the increased cost of a home security system and perimeter fencing with video monitoring because of all of the turnarounds at our house and huge amount of traffic of people that don't even live out there and have no business being out there. There's people driving their ATV's and dirt bikes like crazies up and down the road and parking their trucks on top of the hill, we call the sheriff and they never even show up.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“Greed, Greed, Greed!”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“The Genie is now out of the bottle. Because of the lack of restraint and control of the oil industry, this oil boom will, no doubt, lead to economic disaster in western North Dakota. We have not learned a thing from the past oil booms. Once the initial impact has leveled out and many have left the area, the money mongering vultures will leave with the locals holding the ravage trash bag/North Dakota.”

Rod M., South Heart

“Naturally, there are always concerns about the pace of the oil exploration, the impact it has on our environment and the ongoing construction. Something, needed to happen, though. It was honestly, almost a drag to wake up here a few years ago. It was so "hum drum." Never, did I expect this recent boom, but I am excited to be a part of it, or to be living and experiencing it. While I waiver on concerns of the fracturing, I would also love to be a beneficiary of an oil well.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“I hate to drive in Dickinson anymore! Just take a look at the increase in crimes and accidents! I have visited a lot with people from out of state and for the most part they hate it here! They made the decision to come to the land of plenty so they need to respect it or leave!”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Dickinson is not the place our parents raised their children, I don't know if that is good or bad.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Change is good but not all that comes is good. Housing is awful, so costly it is embarrassing to say you are from Dickinson and people have to pay so much.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Too many non-English speaking people in the medical and service fields. Do we have enough WATER for all the expansion?”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Western North Dakota needs innovation. Politicians need to be courting other high tech industry now that the coffers are full. Once the drilling declines, and it will, there will be nothing left of most of these now sprawling towns. The infustructer (sic) is haphazard at best. The oil industry is dirty and is bringing in the roughest of crowds. It is unfortunate, but I am leaving the state. There are many states that are cleaner, more beautiful, more stable with less crime with a much better quality of life.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“I believe local officials are blind to the needs of citizens and are only lining their own pockets with land sales and business deals, and pontificate on how great the Bakken has made Dickinson, when in fact the Bakken hasn't made Dickinson any better, but rather worse as infrastructure and basic needs of citizens (ie. Produce that won't rot in a day) as well as quality of life for citizens that have lived here forever and wish to continue to do so at the same quality of life we lived previously.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“i have seen the drug/crime in Dickinson first hand. The meth/Heroine problem is way bigger then law enforcement even knows. It is taking over our town. The crime is out of control also. When you can throw a rock from a meth dealers house and hit the swmccc, id say there is a problem.”

Anonymous male, age 26-34

“The Oil Boom was the worst thing to happen for North Dakota. Yes the unemployment rate is low, but the quality of life and what ND used to stand for are long gone. We are simply destroying everything that God and our ancestors worked so hard to create for us. We’d all be better off if the oil boom ended tomorrow.”

Anonymous female, age 19-25

“SW ND is very much the worse due to the oil boom, from increased crime to increasingly poor hunting to overall quality of life. Used to look forward to coming out to the Badlands for a couple weeks every Fall, but it is pretty well ruined now…”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“I was born and raised in Dickinson. It was a clean, quiet, safe place to raise children. We knew nothing about drugs, other than alcohol. Life in general was affordable. Now GREED has forced many people to leave the area, and you have big city crime in a little community which was and never will be prepared for it. I will never return to visit, only to take care of business in Dunn County. Never confuse progress with destruction.”

Don H., Texas

“I think Dickinson is "doing it the right way" and I think our leaders deserve a lot of the credit for that. Many other energy impacted communities are a mess. Having said that, we NEED to pass the bond issue for the new middle school. If not, it could set our community back a great deal!”

Dave M., Dickinson

“The oil industry is destroying our roads, overcrowding our towns, increasing crime, and driving up the cost of living. For those of us not working in the oil industry just what good is it? We suffer though (sic) all the problems and get nothing in return.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“I've lived in Dickinson for the last 10 years. Affordable housing and availability is terrible. Never thought I would see a traffic problem. Some of the people I've met are really good some NOT! All in all I still like living here!”

John M., Dickinson

“While it has increased the income, the expenses in the area have raised accordingly along with it. It is not our small town anymore & I miss it greatly. I never thought I'd see hookers, the violence or other things in our small community.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“Our population has grown. Our streets need to start accommodating that. Not five years from now -- but now.”

Anonymous female, age 26-34

“It is not just our changing landscape that we need to pay attention to. Fracking is going to leave a tremendous footprint on this area. The quality of our drinking water will suffer as well as our farmland. We still need to strive for greener more sustainable energy sources.”

Anonymous female, age 26-34

“I feel badly for the people who used to live on the outskirts of town. They are now in the middle of the building boom. Most of the people who live in those areas have lived there for years. They chose those areas for the peace and quiet. Now those areas have heavy traffic and new buildings.”

Anonymous female, age 26-34

“Not everybody who is employed gets oil related wages. Without the people who work in retail, eating establishments etc. the building and growth could not survive. From what I read in the newspaper and see on TV news, there is an increase in crime and drugs. The court systems seem to allow the individuals involved a slap on the hand and down the road they commit more crimes. I feel very unsafe in our community, Things I used to do at different times of the day, I have stopped.”

Janis G., Dickinson

“With the influx of people I feel less safe. I hear about assaults and such and it frightens me.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“With all the money in this area, the city needs to improve its image. Clean up this town, invest in downtown, update roads, traffic signals. It seems everyone is in it for themselves, with no community in mind. My theory is that if one business updates its facility it becomes infectious for others to do the same. I was born and raised here, and recently moved back after being away for 30 years and their (sic) are buildings that have never changed, you would think that they would update their business to attract more patrons. Some companies have done a great job of this, we just need more to care about their community and what image it presents. The greed of alot of people in this area will someday come back to bite them right where it hurts. The roads in this town are in need of repairs and or replacement. Plan for the future, Dickinson will continue to grow. Think outside the box, look to other cities to see how they have grown, learn from their mistakes and capitalize on what did work.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“Changes that we have seen and read about are part of the "growing pains" that come with a sudden burst in the economy that can happen in any part of the world. I'm glad for the changes, and diversified people that we have with those changes. It opens the door for tolerance of other people and the opportunity to proudly share our values that we were taught and in turn teach our children.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“With the influx of outsiders from areas with more progressive views on mental health AND developmental disabilities and less pernurious penny pinching for human services, I anticipate that Dickinson will be a great place, combining the strong values of the past with understanding of modern human needs and community.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“I like the peace and quiet, that's why I have always chose to stay living here. I don't like all of the changes that are coming and happening.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“Greed and poor planning has left Dickinson a mess. Crime is up and we don't know how much because it's not written about. Greedy landlords have caused a financial crisis for those who do not work higher paying jobs. Women don't feel safe. We now have a home security system and I have a concealed weapon permit. Our cops are idiots and don't even know the basic of Constitutional rights. What was a place we thought about retiring in is now a place we can't wait to get out of.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“We need to follow the road maps of larger areas, when dealing with rapid influx of people. We can't keep pretending to be "small town" -- we need to get way ahead of what's happening. In every area: regulations (traffic and rentals), development, infrastructure, transit, commercial and shopping, etc.”
Linn H., Amidon

“I don't think the city has done a very good job with keeping up with the changes especially in regards to traffic. Another concern is the police and how they are not handling the increased amount of drugs and drug use in the area. They need to b cracking down and making some arrests to deter the increased amount in the area. Talk to young people in the community and they tell u drugs r available whenever they want. How come the cops don't know this?”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“Dickinson wasn't perfect but we had a very nice community before the oil impact. Now I am looking forward to getting out of here and the sooner the better!”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“I'm more disappointed with the bad that the industry has brought. I know it only takes 1bad to give the rest a bad name, but there has been entirely more than 1 bad. From the sex trafficking to the drugs, Dickinson has really gotten dirty, this coming from a DSU alum.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“I am concerned that the ‘city fathers’ have not put enough effort and funding into public safety. The influx in population and financial gain have brought the elements of drugs and prostitution to the forefront. I suspect many residents have concealed weapons or have them readily assessable. Our police need expanded funding to provide more officers and increased public presence on our streets. I no longer feel safe in my community.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“This is a great time to be a resident here in the Dickinson area, and to be a part of history in the make.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“After being born and raised in Dickinson, then spending nearly 38 years there raising my family, I am in shock by the changes, especially the greed involved in the high cost of housing and groceries. The wholesome Dickinson I knew and loved is long gone.”

Anonymous female, age 65-79

“A lot of locals have gotten greedy!”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“I like what is happening and the change of pace is very good for Southwestern North Dakota. In ten or twelve more years we will think it is the normal.”

Anonymous male, age 50-64

“This is progress and we need to welcome it. There should be more guidelines in place such as a truck route, affordable housing, shopping options, and a police force that is large enough to deal with the influx of crime.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Getting scarier by the day. With no affordable housing, thought of being homeless after all these years is a possibility. Service industry is hurting with not enough qualified workers to fill the needs of the new population and they don't make enough to money to live here, A no win situation.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“I'm a newcomer, and it's very obvious that an overwhelming amount of the ‘locals’ dislike what is happening here. I can assure you we aren't all bad. Plenty of us are trying to assimilate our lives into this community. Please don't cast us all in the same net.”

Helena C., Dickinson

“Yes, the boom has brought economic success to the area, but at what price? At some point, those in our government have to take the reins back from the oil industry before we the people are left with nothing but a barren landscape filled with oil wells, toxic dumps, and litter.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Until there is some stability in the infrastructure this growth will be a challenge. Once the the new folks coming in to the area get a sense of community involvement.”

Keith K., Bowman

“The city sucks now. Not many activities for children. The priority infrastructure is hotels, bars, banks, and shopping centers. Not a good city for children anymore with overcrowded schools and greedy people taking whatever they can from people. I moved to a different state to get away from the area, last month, 1600 miles away. I moved to a bigger city and here you get more for your money than you ever will in Dickinson. Dickinson is still small rural living but they think they live and must pay for services like the Kardashians. Hippo-critical people. It is not a pleasant place to live.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“Not everyone works in the energy fields. Not everyone has the good fortune of owning oil property!”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

“Once housing, infrastructure, shopping and Dinning (sic) catch up and we see more new people turning into long term residence this place will be even better, right now it is growing pains.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“Get rid of pan handlers. Enforce laws, and don't just slap criminals hands when they do wrong. Our roads and ditches are full of trash. People don't feel safe in their hometown. Thanks to high rent, there is no extra money left to spend in the community.”

Anonymous male, age 35-49

“While the diversity being added to our area is extremely welcome and needed, I am concerned with the ability of our community to handle the needs of a diverse population and the increase in crime that goes along with growth. Maintaining a safe and family friendly place to live is paramount to the growth of the area being a positive experience. If we are not able to keep our community a safe place, the diversity will stop and the growth will continue in a negative way. This is my home, I would like to be able to say that for many years to come.”

Anonymous female, age 35-49

“The energy industry has brought many jobs and good wages, but not everyone works in that field or has mineral royalties. Prices are too high for people to earn a good living. It is a struggle, especially for seniors. The crime has risen rapidly and I no longer feel safe, especially since the shooting in my neighborhood. Many longtime residents are moving away because of the high cost of living and rapid changes; not always good. Our roadways are in terrible condition and are becoming unsafe to drive on. Our streets are dirty and littered with debris. So many people have an ‘I don’t care,’ attitude and litter from their vehicles. The noise level from trains’ air horns, and loud tail pipes from cars and trucks disrupt our peacefulness. It’s difficult to get a good night’s rest. the good ole days seem gone forever But we could get the pride back in our once beautiful city if everyone does their part. Take care of your surroundings and set a good example for those who don’t seem to care.”

Anonymous female, age 50-64

 
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