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Stephanie Lindstrom, right, and her attorney, Erika Chisholm, listen to Southwest District Judge William Herauf during a pretrial conference on Tuesday at the Stark County Courthouse. Lindstrom is accused of murdering her newborn baby last July.

Bowman woman accused of murdering newborn baby will go to trial

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news Dickinson, 58602
Dickinson North Dakota 1815 1st Street West 58602

Stephanie Lindstrom, the 43-year-old Bowman woman accused of murdering her newborn baby in July, will go to trial. However, no date for the trial has been set.

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Lindstrom is accused of drowning a child she gave birth to in a toilet on July 23. A coroner determined the baby was born alive and the cause of death was drowning.

She is charged with murder, a Class AA felony with a maximum sentence of life in prison.

Bowman County State’s Attorney Andrew Weiss and Lindstrom’s attorney, Erica Chisholm, agreed that a trial would take at least five days, but more likely six or seven days, during a pretrial conference Tuesday before Southwest District Judge William Herauf in the Stark County Courthouse.

“I would hate to err on the short side, your honor,” Chisholm said. “We could potentially accomplish it within the five days, but I believe seven would be more realistic.”

Weiss expected the prosecution’s side alone to take four to five days.

“It may be accomplished in five (days), but with jury selection and everything else that comes with,” Weiss said.

Both sides would like to leave the option of a plea agreement open. All evidence and reports should be filed by Friday, Weiss said.

“Discussions will be ongoing in sort of a teeter-totter sort of a method,” Weiss said. “If the report comes in one way, it will be one offer. If it comes in another way, separate offer. At this point, we could proceed like that.”

No resolutions had been proposed by Tuesday’s hearing. Herauf said he would like to see any agreements before the current scheduled trial date, Feb. 5.

If the matter does go to trial, it will most likely be moved to accommodate the length of time needed, Herauf said.

“In the meantime, we’re going to try to find a slot where we can accomplish a five-to-seven day trial,” Herauf said. “We may have to take a Saturday because we are extremely booked up.”

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