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NDDOT launches Name-A-Plow contest

Entrants can provide their name ideas for their home district's plow until Nov. 30

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A snow plow following an accident on U.S. Highway 10 on Wednesday east of Tioga, N.D. Submitted

BISMARCK — North Dakotans will have the chance to name the vehicles charged with clearing their streets thanks to a Department of Transportation contest.

The NDDOT announced the start of its Name-A-Plow Contest on Wednesday, Nov. 3. The competition runs until Nov. 30, with contest winners getting the chance to meet the plow operators and have a picture taken with the plow.

"Asking North Dakotans to submit snowplow names is another fun way to get the public interested and engaged in being safe this winter," said Brad Darr, NDDOT Maintenance Director, in a news release. "We hope people submit their best names and then promptly download the ND Roads app so they can be up to date on winter weather in their area."

Submitted names must be deemed appropriate and under 15 characters. If the same name is submitted multiple times, the entry that came first will be the one considered. Groups are allowed to submit a name, but each entry must include a designated contact.

Find more information on winter weather driving, the ND Roads app and the Name-A-Plow Contest at dot.nd.gov .

Related Topics: TRANSPORTATIONNORTH DAKOTA
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