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Obama explains Keystone XL pipeline veto in interview with WDAY’s Kealy

WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama explained his veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill in an interview with WDAY anchor Kerstin Kealy broadcast Thursday night.

WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama explained his veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill in an interview with WDAY anchor Kerstin Kealy broadcast Thursday night.
“Part of the reason North Dakota has done so well is that we have been very much promoting domestic, U.S. energies,” the president said in a one-on-one, sit-down interview with Kealy at the White House that aired on WDAY at 6 p.m. “I’ve already said I’m happy to look at how we can increase pipeline production for U.S. oil, but Keystone is for Canadian oil to send that down to the Gulf.
“It bypasses the United States and is estimated to create a little over 250, maybe 300 permanent jobs,” Obama continued. “We should be focusing more broadly on American infrastructure for American jobs and American producers, and that’s something that we very much support.”
The bill would have given Congress the power to approve Keystone XL, which would skirt the North Dakota Bakken as it transports more than 800,000 barrels of oil sands per day from Canada to the Gulf Coast. It would also have the ability to transport 100,000 barrels of oil from the Oil Patch.
Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., spearheaded the bill as its lead sponsor. Both the House and Senate passed the bill before it landed on Obama’s desk on Tuesday. The president vetoes the bill the same day.
Hoeven was unavailable for comment Thursday night.
Kealy said the pipeline veto was a topic WDAY “viewers flooded social media with.” Her news crew was among just four from across the country that were invited for a day of White House briefings and a one-on-one interview with Obama.
WDAY was given only four minutes to interview the president, but Kealy said it was “stretched” into a little over six minutes.
Kealy said she and a WDAY crew attended briefings on the economy, jobs, trade and the importance of exports. One topic was the Obama administration’s “Made in Rural America” initiative, which “gives people and business in areas like North Dakota and Minnesota the tools for success in our digital economy,” Kealy said.

The Press News Editor April Baumgarten contributed to this report.

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