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Palmer Amaranth discovered in South Dakota

FARGO -- South Dakota farmers have discovered Palmer Amaranth weed and North Dakota officials are urging farmers to keep a sharp eye for a "spawn of evil" during harvest.

FARGO - South Dakota farmers have discovered Palmer Amaranth weed and North Dakota officials are urging farmers to keep a sharp eye for a “spawn of evil” during harvest.
South Dakota State University weed scientists say the weed was found in a sunflower field in Buffalo County next to the Missouri River in central South Dakota.
“Palmer Amaranth is a vigorous weed that is a member of the pigweed family that also includes common water hemp, redroot pigweed, prostrate pigweed and others,” said Paul O. Johnson, SDSU Extension weed science coordinator.
The weed is native to the southwest U.S. It is an annual and reproduces only by seed. Scientists don’t know if seasons are long enough in North Dakota for it to produce viable seed, or whether that seed can overwinter, Olson said. The weed has already reproduced in Pennsylvania, Iowa and Michigan.
Olson is concerned the area next to the Missouri River might provide a favorable microclimate for overwintering.

Related Topics: WEEDSAGRICULTURE
Mikkel Pates is an agricultural journalist, creating print, online and television stories for Agweek magazine and Agweek TV.
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