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An Eggstravagant hunt in Old Medora

Chateau De Mores of Medora would like to invite area residents to their 79th annual egg hunt on April 3 at Chimney Park but prospective attendees will have to hurry as limited spaces remain.

Medora Egg Hunt.jpg
Chateau De Mores of Medora would like to invite area residents to their 79th annual egg hunt on April 3 at Chimney Park but prospective attendees will have to hurry as limited spaces remain. (Courtesy of Chateau De Mores/Chateau De Mores)

Chateau De Mores of Medora would like to invite area residents to their 79th annual egg hunt on April 3 at Chimney Park but prospective attendees will have to hurry as limited spaces remain. Assistant Supervisor of Chateau De Mores Ed Sahlstrom said that in keeping with the state and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, there will be two different main events that attendees may register for.

Sahlstrom recommends registering right away, noting that the first slot which will run from 11-11:30 a.m. has been filled to capacity and the second, running from 1-1:30 p.m., is already 50% full.

Refreshments, a customary option of many egg hunts, will not be provided by the event. Sahlstrom highlighted that options will be available elsewhere.

“We won’t be able to do that (have refreshments)...there will be some restaurants open, but this year we can’t serve food...we’re hoping (that) with the cooperation of the town, which we think is happening, there will be shops open,” Sahlstrom said.

Sahlstrom said he was not sure exactly which businesses will be open, however, he did mention The Farmhouse Cafe as a possibility.

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Sahlstrom said the hunt began 79 years ago after the Chateau’s first site supervisor, Harry Roberts began depositing eggs along the chateau for local children to look for during Eastertide — usually occurring on Easter Sunday. Years later, the hunt was opened to anyone of age.

Under normal circumstances the event would garner more than 400 people in attendance, but this year will look a bit different.

About 5,000 eggs will be hidden for event goers to find. Each egg will be filled with undisclosed surprises, including special eggs resulting in a special prize.

Sahlstrom said hunters will be separated into age groups to ensure that all participants are able to find eggs fairly and even highlighted a “quiet hunt” for children with special needs which will take place inside of the Chateau’s Interpretive Center.

“They (children with special needs) come here so they can get a chance to participate in the egg hunt...that will be running (from) 1:30 to 2p.m.,”Sahlstrom said.

The egg hunt has grown over the years, despite being cancelled last year as the then encroaching pandemic brought unprecedented changes to North Dakota.

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic Sahlstrom said the staff will be masked and social distancing, but noted that guests are not required to wear masks.

“The hundreds of people that come (to the hunt) will be very easily socially distanced...last year was much more strict, but this year, we will still obey those rules (COVID guidelines) so that everybody’s comfortable and safe,” Sahlstrom said.

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Related Topics: EVENTSDICKINSONMEDORA
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