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Human Services expands statewide adolescent residential treatment program through contract with Eckert Youth Homes in Williston

This new contract, which begins in January 2022, will allow Eckert Youth Homes to increase capacity from eight to 10 youth in need of this intensive service after community-based treatment options have been ruled out.

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The North Dakota Department of Human Services’ Behavioral Health Division awarded a second contract to Eckert Youth Homes in Williston to expand a statewide residential addiction treatment program currently serving youth, from ages 14 to 18, struggling with addiction and co-occurring mental health conditions, according to a press release.

This new contract, which begins in January 2022, will allow Eckert Youth Homes to increase capacity from eight to 10 youth in need of this intensive service after community-based treatment options have been ruled out. The division first contracted with Eckert Youth Homes in February 2020 for the program that has served 70 youth from across the state.

“We focus on helping youth and their families understand the complexities of addiction and assist with meeting individualized goals to reach their full potential,” said Dr. Leah Hoffman, clinical director for Eckert Youth Homes. “Seeking treatment can be overwhelming and confusing for families. We value helping families navigate the intricacies of residential treatment.”

The program includes a multidisciplinary team that uses multiple interventions to provide a comprehensive approach to treatment addressing the medical, biological, psychological, social and spiritual needs of each youth.

Funding for the expanded program was provided by the division’s federal Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant. This effort also supports the 2018 Human Services Research Institute’s report that examined the response of the state’s behavioral health system to the well-being and needs of North Dakotans.

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For more information on the adolescent residential addiction treatment program, visit Eckert Youth Homes online at eckertyouth.com .

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