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Rotary Celebrates 100 years of service

On Feb. 24, Dickinson’s chapter did just that with a centennial celebration taking place at the Roosevelt Grand Dakota Hotel, located at 532 15th St. W., beginning with a 6:00 p.m. with a social hour during which attendees mixed and mingled with fellow rotarians and guests to live music.

Longevity is what every entity strives for, and since 1921 Dickinson’s very own Rotary Club has been serving its populace for a century. A cause for celebration, right?

On Feb. 24, Dickinson’s chapter did just that with a centennial celebration taking place at the Roosevelt Grand Dakota Hotel, located at 532 15th St. W., beginning with a 6:00 p.m. with a social hour during which attendees mixed and mingled with fellow rotarians and guests to live music.

At 6:30 p.m., President John Heinen gave a brief address welcoming those in attendance, which was followed by the national anthem led by the Master of Ceremonies, Joe Wiegand, and sung by all in attendance.

Wiegand who works as a Theodore Roosevelt repriser in Medora, said he was happy to just be Joe at least for one night.

“While I performed for my Rotary Club as Theodore Roosevelt...It was nice and fun to be Joe for the majority of that meeting...It was nice to perform and be the master of ceremonies just as myself,” Wiegand said.

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Prior to dinner, Secretary Kari Shea prayed over the event and food and once the amens were said, the chowing began on a dinner consisting of what Joe Wiegand called meatloaf, mashed potatoes and carrots, served with a caramel cheesecake.

After dinner, at around 7 p.m., the main part of the evening began with the presentation of awards. The awards were then followed by a presentation of a check to CHI Health at Home Hospice for $1,500, on behalf of the Dan Anderson family.

Toward the end of the evening, rotarians in attendance gathered together for a group photo in honor of 100 years, followed shortly by a live band dance.

Wiegen said he’s proud to be a rotarian and highlighted how the rotary club is full of great people who do great things.

“It’s the feeling when you attend a Rotary Club meeting, there’s so much goodwill and joy and fellowship at Rotary that when you leave that Rotary Club meeting and go back to work and work with your family and friends, you just do so in a joyful happy way,” Wiegand said. “I find that rotarians by nature are positive doers, they are people that get things done in the community…”

Distributing dictionaries to 3rd graders in Dickinson schools and other nearby areas, a pancake breakfast and Pheasant hunt raffles for the polio plus initiative, according to the program for the event, make up only a fraction of the Rotary Club’s ongoing projects.

Ending polio is a major project of Rotary International as a whole, and in partnership with the World Health Organization, the US Center for Disease Control, The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) among others, Rotary International plans to help eradicate polio through vaccination efforts. To date, the organization has helped vaccinate around 2.5 billion people.

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