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Sax Motor Co. helps fight hunger on Western Edge with virtual food drive

From now through Friday, Dec. 31, Sax Motor Co. will match dollar for dollar up to $5,000. Each dollar that a person donates helps provide six meals to those in need.

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Sax Motor Co. in Dickinson is working to help fight hunger in the area community by hosting a monetary/virtual food drive through the end of 2021.

From now through Friday, Dec. 31, Sax Motor Co. will match dollar for dollar up to $5,000. Each dollar that a person donates helps provide six meals to those in need. Local agencies that benefit from this virtual food drive include AMEN (the Association to Meet Emergency Needs) Food Pantry, Belfield Medora Food Pantry, Beach Food Pantry, Dunn County Food Pantry, New England Open Door Food Pantry and Mott Food Pantry.

"Each donation will provide not only the gift of food, but the gift of hope for food-insecure children and families," a press release read.

To drop off monetary donations in person, visit Sax Motor Co. at 21st St. E. For more information, visit greatplainsfoodbank.fenly.org/teams/saxmotor .

Related Topics: PRESS RELEASESDICKINSON
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