FARGO — Ever since Tasha Gorentz was a child, she’s been passionate about animals.

“I originally wanted to go to school to be a veterinarian,” Gorentz said.

Instead, she operates the Fargo-based rescue service known as Kritter Krazy Reptile and Exotic Rescue. Gorentz is the one to call when abandoned, displaced or unwanted reptiles and exotic animals need help. The service specializes in rescue, rehabilitation and “re-homing.”

“Our first responsibility is getting animals safe and healthy,” Gorentz said.

Once they’re adoptable, she said, the rescue embarks on finding them their “forever homes.” It operates across North Dakota, Minnesota, South Dakota, Montana and Iowa.

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Educational programming, which is a newly added component, includes school visits and “birthing parties.”

Gem is a red-footed tortoise and is an ambassador animal at Kritter Krazy, a reptile and exotic animal rescue. Ambassador animals are not available for adoption. They live at the shelter and do events to help educate the public and bring attention to the need for services. Chris Flynn / The Forum
Gem is a red-footed tortoise and is an ambassador animal at Kritter Krazy, a reptile and exotic animal rescue. Ambassador animals are not available for adoption. They live at the shelter and do events to help educate the public and bring attention to the need for services. Chris Flynn / The Forum

'Volunteer hobby'

Everything she’s learned has been a blend of personal research and experience.

She’s rescued a lot of snakes, but also chinchillas, lizards, frogs, geckos, iguanas, bearded dragons, bunnies and even farm animals such as horses, donkeys and sheep.

“We dabble a little bit in wildlife,” Gorentz said, “but you have to be really careful with that because of laws.”

Once, when an elderly woman died, a 3.5-foot alligator was found in her Fargo apartment. Gorentz was called to the scene.

“I was probably 110 pounds at that point,” she said. “I knock on the door, and they were like, ‘You’re the one who’s here to get this alligator?’ And I’m, like, ‘Yep. That’s me.’”

She’s also a full-time dispatcher for a trucking company, as well as a full-time mother.

“I don’t sleep,” she said.

It all started as a “volunteer hobby” in 2009 when Gorentz graduated high school. She’s been working solo for the last decade. In March, she applied for nonprofit status with the state. Board members have now been added to Kritter Krazy, and soon it will be granted 501(c)(3) status.

Aaron Sauer, a Moorhead resident who once adopted a Kenyan sand boa from Kritter Krazy, said Gorentz is pretty incredible.

“She’s almost like a superhero,” Sauer said.

Sauer is also a part-time Petco employee who works in the aquatics and reptile department. It’s a convenient spot to pass along Gorentz’s mission and contact information.

“Almost anybody I come into contact with in the reptile section I tell about Tasha,” he said.

Personal mission

Running the rescue out of her Fargo home, where she also fosters children, Gorentz can house anywhere from 50 to 80 animals during any given week. They’re kept in a safe room.

The push for nonprofit status comes at a time when Gorentz is looking for a permanent home for Kritter Krazy, one that’s not her own.

“We’re really kind of desperate here for a commercial space or a warehouse space,” she said.

A lot of the cost to run the rescue is out of Gorentz’s own pocket.

“That nonprofit status is really going to be the turnaround on trying to be able to get some funding and let us grow,” she said.

Emmalee Woods, a Grand Forks resident who just graduated from the University of North Dakota in December with a degree in wildlife biology, does transport for Kritter Krazy. She’s traveled as far as three hours away to rescue animals. Woods pays for her own time and mileage.

It’s worth it. Some of the reptiles she’s picked up have been in poor shape, Woods said, and getting them back to Gorentz is a top priority.

“I’ve always wanted to work with her,” Woods said. “I wanted to make her rescue process as easy as possible, so volunteering with her is what I did to help her.”

Woods is about to move to Arizona to work at one of the largest reptile sanctuaries in the United States.

Gorentz estimates she’s rescued and re-homed between 400 to 450 animals since 2009. Increased popularity in the exotic pet trade accounts for some of it, she said.

“It’s becoming more acceptable in society to have them normalized as pets and hobbies,” she said.

Tasha Gorentz runs Kritter Krazy, a reptile and exotic animal rescue service. Here she's with Gu Bear, a red Argentine tegu. Gu Bear's owner became ill and wasn't prepared to take care of her. Chris Flynn / The Forum
Tasha Gorentz runs Kritter Krazy, a reptile and exotic animal rescue service. Here she's with Gu Bear, a red Argentine tegu. Gu Bear's owner became ill and wasn't prepared to take care of her. Chris Flynn / The Forum

Sometimes life changes render owners unable to care for the exotic pets, but often it’s unpreparedness following an impulse buy.

Her phone will ring if animal control finds a reptile when an owner dies, or an apartment is vacated and reptiles are left behind. It happens more than people may realize.

“Every day,” she said. “Every single day.”

Since she’s started to aggressively advertise Kritter Krazy, numbers of abandoned animals have gone down a bit, Gorentz said, and more people have reached out to her.

“This is 100% my passion project,” Gorentz said.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/KKRERESCUE/.