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31st North Dakota Blue Book highlights Historical Society

BISMARCK - North Dakota's Blue Book is loaded with history about the Peace Garden State, and the 31st edition pays tribute to those who have chronicled the state's past.

BISMARCK – North Dakota’s Blue Book is loaded with history about the Peace Garden State, and the 31st edition pays tribute to those who have chronicled the state’s past.

Secretary of State Al Jaeger unveiled the 582-page book at the Capitol and presented a ceremonial copy to Gov. Jack Dalrymple on Monday, the 126th anniversary of statehood.

The book’s first chapter shares the history of the North Dakota Historical Society, from the formation of the Ladies Historical Society of Bismarck in September 1889 to the dedication a year ago of a $51.7 million expansion and  renovation of the North Dakota Heritage Center, which Jaeger called “one of the finest museums in the country.”

The 2015-17 Blue Book also adds a chapter highlighting the growth and diversity of the state’s energy industry.

Dalrymple joked that earlier editions of the book were “the driest collection of trivia” he had ever seen, and he said the new edition is a “first-class and very entertaining” piece of work. It contains factoids on everything from the Miss Rodeo North Dakota to the number of deer hunting licenses available each year since 2000.

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Jaeger said the book wouldn’t be possible without the dedication of more than 50 writers, editors, photographers and other volunteers who started working on the book in August 2014.

The Blue Book is published every biennium. Past editions are available online through the secretary of state’s website at  www.nd.gov/sos .

The state printed 1,000 copies of the book, which sells for $20 at the Heritage Center’s Museum Store. The store also takes orders at (701) 328-2879.

 

Related Topics: AL JAEGER
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