The Dickinson Police Department promoted one of its senior patrol officers to the rank of corporal during a special pinning ceremony on Thursday, Sept. 9, at the City of Dickinson's Public Safety Center in a ceremony lead by Police Chief Dustin Dassinger.

The promotion comes shortly after Sgt. Mike Hanson’s promotion in August, and highlighted the advancement opportunities of Dickinson's police force.

Casey Brosten, a Montana native, was all smiles as fellow officers and administration gathered in the training room to share a few laughs and welcome their newly promoted corporal to the ranks. When asked how the promotion felt, Brosten was succinct in his response.

“It’s pretty awesome," he said.

Prior to his arrival in Dickinson, Brosten enlisted in the U.S. Army as an infantry man in February 2011 and served three years with an honorable discharge. In August of 2013, Brosten was hired by DPD as a police officer, and has for the past three years been an active face in the community in the patrol division.

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Working his way up to the Investigative Division of the police department has not been an easy feat, but Brosten has assisted in cases with the agency's detectives for the previous two years.

"I’m really humble,” Brosten said. “I’ve been here eight years at the police department in Dickinson and I’ve loved every minute of it. It’s been very good to me and it’s been more than anything I could ask. I really love it.”

Lt. Mike Hanel, highlighted the intangible attributes that set Brosten apart and made the promotion decision a must for the department.

“He has really good decision making capabilities, so that is obviously a critical role," he said.

Hanel outlined the added responsibilities the newly promoted corporal would have in his new role.

"The corporals are basically the No. 2 on the shift, so when the sergeant — shift supervisors — are away, they basically take over the role of shift supervisor for that evening,” he said. “In addition, they’re also tasked with a lot of the initial field training for new officers that come to their shift, and Casey has exhibited a lot of leadership capabilities for training new officers.”

In all smiles, Casey Brosten visits with his family and fellow officers, cracking a few jokes before he is pinned as the new corporal of the Dickinson Police Department during a special ceremony Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, at the City of Dickinson Public Safety Center. (Jackie Jahfetson / The Dickinson Press)
In all smiles, Casey Brosten visits with his family and fellow officers, cracking a few jokes before he is pinned as the new corporal of the Dickinson Police Department during a special ceremony Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, at the City of Dickinson Public Safety Center. (Jackie Jahfetson / The Dickinson Press)

By 2018, Brosten was promoted to senior officer. While climbing the ladder, Brosten has gained experience on the Southwest Tactical Team, the Bike Control Team in addition to field training with recruits.

Since the retirement of Capt. David Wilkie, the department has been working toward finalizing the remaining cycle of promotions, Hanel said, adding that Brosten’s pinning ceremony was the last portion of that process. With plenty of qualified candidates suited for the corporal position, Hanel added that it reassures police administration that there are upcoming leaders ready to take on more responsibility.

“We’re really excited about all the police promotions that happened. I think the department sits very well in terms of the knowledge and experience that’s on the street right now and leadership abilities of all those who were promoted,” Hanel said, adding, “Even those that didn’t get promoted this time round, they’ve reinforced our (knowledge) that we have a department full of very capable officers and the city is in good hands.”

Each promotion provides the department with not only a fresh perspective, but enhances the overall quality of staff decision by being able to bring new insights to the table, Hanel said — a sentiment that was shared by Brosten.

“From my military experience and just working here during the oil boom, I got to see and experience a lot of good things for the profession. With law enforcement (having its) ups and downs across the country, I’ve been working through the beginning of it and through it. So luckily, I can bring that in with the newer guys and explain to them the big picture of it all,” Brosten added.