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Alexander Truck Bypass enters final stages of construction

ALEXANDER -- Residents in this Oil Patch city will soon get some relief from traffic. The Alexander Truck Bypass on U.S. Highway 85 has entered the final stages, the North Dakota Department of Transportation announced Friday, but highway traffic ...

ALEXANDER - Residents in this Oil Patch city will soon get some relief from traffic.
The Alexander Truck Bypass on U.S. Highway 85 has entered the final stages, the North Dakota Department of Transportation announced Friday, but highway traffic was moved out of the city and transferred to the new route this weekend.
“We are happy to announce that we are making great progress and accomplishing our goal to enhance road safety and the quality of life for the community of Alexander,” said DOT director Grant Levi said in a statement.
The section of Highway 85 that goes through Alexander will be closed to highway traffic during the last phase of construction. The final project involves constructing entrance roadways at each end of the bypass. During construction, traffic is expected to be head to head on two lanes of the bypass route. Speeds will be reduced to 45 mph and a 12-foot width restriction will be in place. Signs will direct local traffic into Alexander.
The DOT estimates approximately 12,000 vehicles - many of them trucks - travel through Alexander daily. The $28 million bypass project that began in May is meant to alleviate truck traffic.
“The residents of Alexander are excited about the bypass project and becoming a community again,” Mayor Jerry Hatter said at the spring groundbreaking event.
The bypass will accommodate four lanes of traffic on 3.7 of highway. The project is slated to be finished at the end of October.

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