ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Anti-bully pulpit: Miss North Dakota takes her pageant platform to schools

WILLISTON -- Miss North Dakota Delanie Weidrich has been on the move since she returned from the Miss America Scholarship Pageant last September spreading her anti-bullying platform.

2275954+012316.N.WH_.BULLYING-.jpg
Miss North Dakota Delanie Weidrich talks to students at a Williston elementary school on Thursday about her anti-bullying platform. (Williston Herald photo)

WILLISTON -- Miss North Dakota Delanie Weidrich has been on the move since she returned from the Miss America Scholarship Pageant last September spreading her anti-bullying platform.

Called “Beyond the B Word,” her program has helped students across the state, and even some throughout the Midwest, take a new perspective on bullying.

“My favorite part of the job is this right here getting to meet some really awesome students and getting to talk about something that is very important to me,” Wiedrich told the fourth through sixth-graders at a Williston elementary school this past week. “Students don’t really like to talk about it;  it is not a fun subject.”

Wiedrich started out her presentation with her background on the sensitive subject.

“I was that girl that was very small, very shy, and soft spoken,” she said. “I was not very good at sports, and I was kind of nerdy and weird, at least by my school's standards. ”

ADVERTISEMENT

The emotional and physical circumstances, in-person as well as cyber bullying, gave her the ability to relate to what some of the students are going through, she said.  

“I was that girl who hurt herself because she didn't know what to do,” the 2016 Miss North Dakota said. “That was me, but now i stand up here in front of you healthy and strong.”

Wiedrich emphasized the importance of each student taking personal accountability to make a difference and to take action.

“We can’t pretend that it's not happening everywhere. We have to address it in a new way. At the end of the day, it is the people that make the change in a school and ultimately make a change in the world. That's you,” she said as a hush fell over the students. “If you want to stop bullying and the negative way that we treat one another, change the world - it's all up to you; it's in your hands.”

With a look of determination on her face, Wiedrich conveyed the importance of standing up for oneself. A large number of students raised their hands when asked if they had ever been bullied. There were solemn looks across the faces of many as they looked amongst their peers to see who else had their hands raised.

“You have every single right to stand up and say, ‘no,’” she said. “You have every right to tell someone that what you are doing is hurting me. Have courage. Stand up for yourself.”

During the next few months, Wiedrich will be traveling to continue sharing her presentation across the state, as well as being a presenter at the North Dakota Music Awards

What To Read Next
A resolution looking to allow the legislature to consider work requirements on the newly expanded Medicaid program is one step closer to the 2024 ballot.
With HB 1205, Reps Mike Lefor and Vicky Steiner would prohibit "sexually explicit content" in public libraries. Facing an uphill battle, the pair remain united in their commitment to see it passed.
The North Dakota Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.
City accountant reports increases in oil impact, sales tax, hospitality tax and occupancy tax revenue during the Jan. 24 meeting, commission approves two policy amendments.