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City considers adding shared-use path along 21st Street and 10th Avenue East

The city of Dickinson is considering adding another shared-use path to help keep pedestrians and bikers safe on their evening walks and bike rides. The shared-use path would go along 21st Street and 10th Avenue East. City staff and members of KLJ...

The city is considering adding a shared-use path along 21st Street and 10th Avenue East. The Crooked Crane trail, pictured, is one of many shared-use paths in and around Dickinson. (Sydney Mook / The Dickinson Press)
The city is considering adding a shared-use path along 21st Street and 10th Avenue East. The Crooked Crane trail, pictured, is one of many shared-use paths in and around Dickinson. (Sydney Mook / The Dickinson Press)
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The city of Dickinson is considering adding another shared-use path to help keep pedestrians and bikers safe on their evening walks and bike rides.

The shared-use path would go along 21st Street and 10th Avenue East. City staff and members of KLJ's design team listened to what residents had to say about the project during an open house meeting on Tuesday night.
Shared-use paths can be used for walking and biking because they are typically wider than the average sidewalk.

There are several shared-use paths throughout the city, including the Crooked Crane trail at Patterson Lake Recreation Area. The new project would provide connectivity between Dickinson's existing shared-use path system along Highway 22 and 14th Street East.

City leaders wanted to add another shared-use path because residents believe it is an "important amenity," said Loretta Marshik, assistant city engineer. It is also important to be able to connect the paths, she said.

"I think it'll get well-used," Marshik said. "There's some interesting views if you walk along there versus just being in town and with some of the residential areas."

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She believes the shared-use paths encourage people to walk outside without needing to worry about traffic.

"I think it gives people an added comfort vesus trying to walk along maybe their sidewalk and there's a gap or trying to use the edge of the roadway or the shoulder," Marshik said. "This is definitely a safer feel."

Homeowner Helena Chouinard said she likes the idea of the shared-use paths because of the extra safety they provide for walkers and bikers.

"I think it's going to increase overall safety, it's going to just make the overall access to my house easier to get and walk closer to home," she said. "I'm a little bit concerned about the construction impacts during summer and how that's going to impact my day-to-day, but I think it's good."

Lori Simons, another local homeowner, said she believes it will help keep bikers, particularly children, safer. She said she often sees bicyclists riding by their home near 10th Avenue East. The road can be very busy at times, and she said she is always concerned for everyone's safety.

"This will be much safer for them," she said. "... I think it'll be a good thing. I think it'll be fun for our community to be able to use this."

Simons and Chouinard both walk around their neighborhood and will likely use the path.

The city received a federal grant of $250,000 through the Transportation Alternative Program, with any costs above the TAP grant being paid for with local funds. The project is estimated to cost $927,000.

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Marshik said the project will go in front of the City Commission at a later date for approval.

Final plans for the shared-use path are expected to be completed by September 2017, with the project going out for bid in November. Construction would start in the spring or summer of 2018 and would likely take a majority of the summer.

Those who were unable to attend the public input meeting can submit written statements or comments to Justin Hyndman, project engineer KLJ, PO Box 290 Dickinson, N.D. 58602-0290;

or email justin.hyndman@kljeng.com with "Public input meeting" in the subject line. Comments must be submitted by June 21.

Related Topics: DICKINSON
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