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City positions open with new season

The City of Dickinson is hiring. The city's website currently lists 14 open positions. Among them are public safety support supervisor, property appraiser, design engineer and several seasonal positions. "Over the last few months we've had severa...

The City of Dickinson ranked 6th on a 'Best Places to Live in America' list released by Time's Money Magazine on Monday morning. (Grady McGregor / The Dickinson Press)
The City of Dickinson ranked 6th on a 'Best Places to Live in America' list released by Time's Money Magazine on Monday morning. (Grady McGregor / The Dickinson Press)

The City of Dickinson is hiring.

The city's website currently lists 14 open positions. Among them are public safety support supervisor, property appraiser, design engineer and several seasonal positions.

"Over the last few months we've had several full time positions open," City Administrator Joe Gaa said. "It may seem like more now because we have several seasonal positions and we post them all at once."

It is not uncommon for the city to have so many postings.

"It seems like we always have something open in public works, full-time, or even a police officer search going on," Gaa said. "When you have a little over 200 full-time employees, it always seems like we have some job open."

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Shelly Nameniuk, human resources coordinator, reported to city commissioners in March that a communications specialist and street and fleet manager are being sought, and an offer was made for an animal control supervisor.

Newly created positions are also being posted.

The city has recently hired a risk management specialist, a utilities manager (combining two positions: water reclamation manager and water utilities manager) and a legal assistant.

"This year we're looking at more wage studies of our current positions," Gaa said. "It doesn't mean there won't be a few new positions, but not as many."

The new positions were approved by commissioners with the 2019 budget.

"In the future, we're going to be really strategic in how folks ask for new positions," Gaa said. "There's some gaps in service areas, but ultimately we want to make sure if we're adding positions it's increasing the level of service to the public. That's the bar we're going to set."

Gaa said he wants to emphasize labor positions.

"I want to look at our streets department, in particular," he said. "I think they need some more laborers out there."

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The solid waste department often has vacancies, Gaa said, with several turnovers already this year for operators.

"It's just a competitive market," he said. "They all have (commercial drivers licenses) and can go somewhere else if they wanted to do it. It seemed like there was a trend for that."

He added, "It's pretty normal."

A concern remains that the city is losing skilled labor, trained by the city, to the private sector.

"The skills we have here might be looked for by five other employers," Gaa said. "Every one person probably has a chance to work at five different places here. It's great for employees looking for advancement opportunities."

The city is investigating how to best combat this loss, Gaa said.

"You have to pay a pretty good rate, and it depends on what lifestyle you want," he said. "You can work a lot of hours and make a lot of money. You can make good money in fewer hours. You can have a good Monday through Friday schedule, or work nights. There's just a lot of opportunities here, depending on an individual's personality and what they want to do."

Working for the city is worthwhile, Gaa said.

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"We've got good facilities. We have good folks," he said. "We have quite a team here that really enjoys working, being in public service and working to serve the citizens."

He added, "We have a really good thing going here."

To see open positions with City of Dickinson, visit dickinsongov.com/citizen-interests/apply-for-a-job/.

Related Topics: CITY OF DICKINSON
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