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City to auction off surplus items

If you're in the market for a 1967 tractor, a used police car or some American Eagle Outfitters shirts, the Dickinson Surplus Liquidation Auction may be the place for you. The city will be auctioning off hundreds of items from various departments...

If you're in the market for a 1967 tractor, a used police car or some American Eagle Outfitters shirts, the Dickinson Surplus Liquidation Auction may be the place for you. The city will be auctioning off hundreds of items from various departments-including many items that the Dickinson Police Department collected through evidence-beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday at the old Public Works Shop at 615 West Broadway.

Some of the things up for grabs from the DPD include multiple iPad Airs, various brands of sunglasses, a 2012 Dodge Charger police car, a 1991 Air Force blue Chevrolet van, gaming systems and many knives.

Dickinson Public Works Administrative Assistant Lee Ann Thompson and Dickinson Sanitation Manager Aaron Praus have began speaking with various city departments about what they would be willing to give up to the auction in April. The auction was originally planned for June, but was pushed back due to scheduling issues.

Thompson said she is excited to be a part of this year's auction.

"I think it will be exciting," she said. "Having helped Aaron lay everything out and cleaning out the old public works building, it was pretty interesting."

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The city will also be selling older vehicles, including a 1993 Dodge Ram pickup truck, a 2004 Ford F-350 with service tanks and a 1976 International yellow single-axle truck with a sand spreader attached.

Thompson said they only auction off vehicles that are no longer of use to the city, so they may have several thousand miles on them.

"The city uses them for quite a long time before they get rid of them," she said.

Dickinson Public Works Director Gary Zuroff said the auction originally began as a way to clear out the old public works building, which contained many items that were no longer of use to them since they switched buildings in 2014.

"If there was older items that needed to be surplused we didn't want to move it," Zuroff said. "... It's an event to try and get the facilities cleaned up and turn it around a little quicker."

Money raised from the auction, which is being put on by Big D&E Service, will either go to the police department or the Dickinson general fund, depending on where the item originated from.

Thompson added that they do not plan to make the auction a yearly event, mostly because they want to make sure they would have the funds to replace the items that they sell.

"We will continue to maintain what we currently have until there are more funds available," she said. "... We had a lot more vehicles last year than we do this year because we don't have as much money available for 2016 or 2017. We were more conservative as far as replacing vehicles."

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Thompson said last year's auction raked in nearly $100,000, with much of the money coming from the sale of old vehicles that the city could no longer use.

Zuroff thought last year's auction went well and had a high attendance.

"I think it was well received," he said. "There were a lot of people there. We sold a lot of things. I think we sold about everything. There were just a couple things that didn't sell. I thought it went real well."

Other items on the auction block include: a two-year-old soda pop dispenser, several filing cabinets, lawnmowers, paintball guns, GPS systems, an office InkJet printer, a TEC cash register, an electronic letter folder, computer stations and office chairs.

Those are interested in buying something from the auction should make sure to bring cash or check, Zuroff said. Credit cards are not taken at the event. For a complete list of items for sale go to www.bigd-eauction.com.

Related Topics: DICKINSON
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