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Crop Improvement and Seed Association regional meeting coming to Dickinson

Information about new seed varieties and producing seed, and questions about seed laws will be featured at the North Dakota Crop Improvement and Seed Association district meetings set for Dec. 3-6.

The NDCISA works closely with the Experiment Stations, State Seed Department and the Extension Service to promote general crop improvement practices and increase the varieties best adapted to the state. Photo courtesy of the NDCISA
The NDCISA works closely with the Experiment Stations, State Seed Department and the Extension Service to promote general crop improvement practices and increase the varieties best adapted to the state. Photo courtesy of the NDCISA

Information about new seed varieties and producing seed, and questions about seed laws will be featured at the North Dakota Crop Improvement and Seed Association district meetings set for Dec. 3-6.

"Come learn more about the seed industry in North Dakota," says Toni Muffenbier, the association's office manager. "Attending a district meeting is an excellent opportunity to learn more about the organization as we've made some changes recently. It's also a great time to ask questions and meet others who are passionate about agriculture in North Dakota."

On Dec. 4, the Dickinson Research Extension Center will host the Southwest district meeting beginning at 1 p.m. MT. The district meeting will include updates on county membership and checkoff, district resolutions and elections, and a district financial report.

In addition to a business meeting, program topics to be covered during the meetings are expected to include research fee update and impact by the North Dakota State University Research Foundation; small-grain variety update provided by Ryan Buetow an area Extension agronomist from Dickinson; State Seed Department update presented by the North Dakota State Seed Department; Foundation Seedstocks update by the NDSU Foundation Seedstocks project.

Established in 1929, North Dakota Crop Improvement and Seed Association is a non-profit organization supported by county dues, certified seed grower membership and check-offs from the seed increase program. The NDCISA works closely with the Experiment Stations, State Seed Department and the Extension Service to promote general crop improvement practices and increase the varieties best adapted to the state.

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"We make the seed easily available to the farmers of the state." Muffenbeir said. "We encourage the development and implementation of practical and scientific crop production practices, serve as a communication link for North Dakota crop producers in legislative matters relating to production and marketing of their commodities and we sponsor youth activities such as the 4-H crops judging contest at the North Dakota Winter Show."

The association actively supports research, extension and education programs at NDSU and throughout the state, being instrumental in the production and distribution of new varieties of seed. Historically, the organization has coordinated with the Foundation Seedstocks project and County Crop Improvement Associations during new variety releases and increases.

The organization, through certified seed promotional money, encourage the use of quality seeds with an advertising campaign, promotional giveaways and crop shows.

"In these changing times, the agricultural community needs to remain unified and strong," Muffenbier said. "The NDCISA is a strong and supportive group that will fight for the North Dakota farmer."

The meetings are free and open to the public and door prizes will be given away at each of the district meetings. For more information, contact Muffenbier at 701-231-8067 or email toni.muffenbeir@ndsu.edu .

Related Topics: AGRICULTUREDICKINSON
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