SUBSCRIBE NOW Just 99¢ for your first month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Dakota Access Pipeline should be complete next week, company says

MORTON COUNTY, N.D. - Dakota Access LLC expects to introduce oil into the pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation early next week, the company said in court filings.Dakota Access, a subsidiary of Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners...

2898603+082816.n.ad.lakepipeline-2.jpg
A burned vehicle and debris is visible Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, on North Dakota Highway 1806 near the Backwater Bridge, located between two camps set up by pipeline protesters. Photo provided by the Morton County Sheriff's Department
We are part of The Trust Project.

MORTON COUNTY, N.D. - Dakota Access LLC expects to introduce oil into the pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation early next week, the company said in court filings.

Dakota Access, a subsidiary of Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, said the company anticipates crews will install the pipe under Lake Oahe this week and begin final testing, according to a status update filed in federal court.

The company projects that oil may be introduced into the portion of the pipeline near Cannon Ball between Monday, March 20, and Wednesday, March 22, depending on the success of the testing, documents show.

Last week, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg denied a request from Native American tribes to halt construction of the pipeline. Tribes argue the pipeline violates the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is now appealing the decision.

What to read next
Lorenzo Pemberton, 28, was resentenced for attempted murder after agreeing to a plea deal at the Stark County Courthouse Tuesday. The initial charge was vacated by the state's highest court, due to an error in the jury instructions.
The lucky individual had a roughly 1 in 900,000 chance of winning.
The Amnesty report calls for full restoration of tribal jurisdiction over crimes committed in Indian country, and increased funding for prosecution, law enforcement and health care.
The most recent complaints stem from two inspections in 2021, where OSHA says workers in Tea and Salem were at risk of being buried by thousands of pounds of dirt.