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Dickinson residents help out their neighbors during recent snowstorm

Residents in Dickinson came to each other's aid during the snowstorm earlier this week, something Mayor Scott Decker said isn't uncommon for residents in the community to do. "I think the citizens of Dickinson pitch in to help out whether it be a...

A Dickinson man pushed snow from a residential area earlier this week. Residents from the community came together to help out during the recent snow storm. (Press Photo by Ellie Potter)
A Dickinson man pushed snow from a residential area earlier this week. Residents from the community came together to help out during the recent snow storm. (Press Photo by Ellie Potter)

Residents in Dickinson came to each other's aid during the snowstorm earlier this week,

something Mayor Scott Decker said isn't uncommon for residents in the community to do.

"I think the citizens of Dickinson pitch in to help out whether it be a tornado, snowstorm, even if there is some kind of disaster like somebody's house is damaged by a fire, the community pitches in and gets them back on their feet," he said. "We've always had that strong bond in Dickinson."

He said he believes that it comes down to the community being very compassionate.

"I've always been proud of Dickinson regardless of what position I've held from when I was early serving in the army and getting a ton of care packages from the citizens of Dickinson when I was over in Desert Storm," Decker said. "I've always had a sense of pride in our community. I'm glad that everybody is pitching in and helping each other out."

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Jay Elkin, Stark County commissioner, said he believes that the people in the area are unique.

"I believe it's something special to this area that people are still willing to help their neighbors out," he said. "People move into this area and find that the people here are more than friendly and welcoming and willing to help a hand when needed."

Elkin and Decker said they both witnessed people helping others and that they also lended a hand and pulled out a few cars.

"We've all been in those situations, and we've needed help, and someone has always been there to help us, and I think it's great that that tradition continues on," Elkin said.

Neighbors lend a hand

Boston Faulhaber, a senior at Dickinson High School, spent his time on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday pulling out an estimated 23 vehicles.

"My dad was actually surprised with how many people I pulled out," he said.

Faulhaber said he wanted to help after his dad gave him his old truck on the stipulation Boston sold his car. He said he knew his dad was giving him a good deal on the truck which cost a lot more than his car and he wanted to make sure he put it to good use.

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"Like a pay-it-forward type thing," he said. "Not everybody is able to have things like a truck, maybe they can't afford it."

Schools in the area were closed on Tuesday and Wednesday because of the snow, so Faulhaber said he didn't really have anything better to do.

"I thought, 'I don't have school. I don't have anything to do. If anybody needed help getting out, I (had) the time,'" he said. "I didn't mind going around helping, but it was a little expensive. It was definitely worth it."

Faulhaber said he helped people for free, which some of his friends weren't doing.

"I had a couple of friends who were going around and helping, but they were charging," he said. "I didn't want to be one of those people."

He said everyone told him 'thank you' as he was towing them out of the snow, and he even made an agreement with one person who was stuck.

"There was a lady down south that I helped. She was actually 13 weeks pregnant and had two kids in the house and the funny thing was her neighbors across (from her) were also stuck," he said. "So I made a deal with them if I helped them pull out their truck they would help me pull out her car."

He said helping other people out made him feel pretty good about himself and he was "just trying to help when I can."

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David Winegar and his friend Tyler Morriset also helped pull out people. Winegar said he estimated they went through three gallons of gas and 500 miles on his truck helping out.

He said being from Regent taught him how to drive in the conditions.

"(I'm) originally from a rural town, so we didn't even have plows," he said. "We learned how to drive."

He said the keys are "being confident and learning that your brake can be your enemy but knowing your limits also."

Winegar said he used to be a wrecker and thought "why not help people out," and it would be a "good excuse to play in the snow."

Tim Bullinger said he helped people out on his route to work, and that, while it made him late for work, he believes that his boss understood the need to stop to help.

"I know I wouldn't want to be stuck and helpless and just watching people drive by. So I would stop and help," he said. "I liked knowing that I helped make someone's crappy day a little better by helping them on their way."

Daniel McAdams, David Thomas and Red LeFevre were just another group of people helping out.

"Our work got canceled and when my sister got stuck there were so many other people needing help we figured we had nothing else to do," said McAdams. "So we made a morning out of it."

McAdams said most of the people they helped out just weren't used to driving in icy and snowy conditions.

"It was the first big snow of the year, and everyone takes time to adjust, but a strong percentage of the people we pulled out hadn't driven in those kinds of conditions before, or the weather was so bad that they couldn't see the drift before they ran into it and got stuck," he said.

Thomas and McAdams agreed that it was also fun to help out.

"It was something to do with the time off," said Thomas. "We all like to play in the snow, and we are active people. We help(ed) a couple in the morning on our way to work, and when we were sent home we decided we would just cruise around and pull people out. It gave us something to do while having fun and helping others."

Anna Strohecker said that while she just moved into her residence, her neighbors were very helpful even though they didn't know her well.

"I needed to borrow a shovel from my neighbors and instead of handing it over, they came and shoveled my driveway for me," she said.

Shell Bell said that when she got stuck at a restaurant in town, a local taxi driver helped her out. Even though he would have usually charged for the service, he told her not to worry about it since she didn't have any money on hand.

Tina Draper also commended her apartment complex neighbors.

"Lincoln Meadows apartments is a great community," she said. "(I) got stuck pulling in my garage and my neighbors came and helped me. I also saw so many people who ran out when they saw a neighbor get stuck."

And for the most part, people were just doing a good deed without expecting any recognition.

Janell Fisher and her friend helped pull out vehicles until they eventually got stuck themselves.

"A guy in a small Bobcat came out of nowhere and just pushed me right out of it," she said. "Before I could even blink he was gone."

Related Topics: DICKINSON
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