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Dickinson will continue seeking recycling offers

Dickinson will issue another request for proposals for residential recycling after the city commission voted Monday to reject the only offer received so far.

Dickinson city administrator Shawn Kessel swore in the two newest officers to the city's police department, officers Nathaniel Slack (left) and Troy Machovsky, at Monday's commission meeting. Photo by Ellie Potter/The Dickinson Press
Dickinson city administrator Shawn Kessel swore in the two newest officers to the city's police department, officers Nathaniel Slack (left) and Troy Machovsky, at Monday's commission meeting. Photo by Ellie Potter/The Dickinson Press

Dickinson will issue another request for proposals for residential recycling after the city commission voted Monday to reject the only offer received so far.

G and G Garbage Inc. in Dickinson was the only company to respond to the first RFP and offered to service the community at $9 per household a month, said Aaron Praus, the city's solid waste manager at the commission's meeting. Though the commission asked if the company would be able to provide the service at a lower rate, the company said they were unable to do so, Praus said. He and his staff recommended the commission deny the proposal.

"I know we were looking for more around that $5 to $6 range, so when we consider people on fixed incomes, $9 can be quite a lot of change," said commissioner Sarah Jennings. "I would recommend that we deny this proposal and seek other offers."

The commission voted unanimously to deny the proposal and advertise the RFP over the course of another three-week period. Mayor Scott Decker said his reasons for looking into recycling included extending the life of the city's landfill as well as reusing some of the renewable products.

"I would say just in addition to that, we're very cost-conscious," said commission vice president Klayton Oltmanns. "We're trying to do it at a budget that the average consumer can stomach but also making it open for the average consumer that might not be a recycler at heart. We want to make it as easy as possible, and that's providing a separate dumpster, so that it's a super easy process... and it doesn't create a lot of work for the homeowners."

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New officers

Dickinson Police Chief Dustin Dassinger also introduced the two newest officers to the department.

Officer Nathaniel Slack moved to Dickinson in January from Amherst, Ohio, having previously been employed by the Lorain County Sheriff's Office as a project specialist. Officer Troy Machovsky moved to Dickinson in March from Inkster, N.D., having served in the U.S. Army for the past 13 years. City administrator Shawn Kessel swore both officers in at Monday's meeting.

Dassinger also introduced Gambit, a Belgian Malinois, and currently the department's only dual-purpose apprehension dog. Gambit has worked with his handler, Sgt. Corey Lee, for about four years.

Other commission news

The commission approved the first reading of the city's revised liquor license ordinance. If they pass the ordinance at their next meeting, during its second reading, then that ordinance will take effect immediately.

The city is still looking to fill its city attorney position. The commission asked at their last meeting to reduce the experience level in the job description from eight to five years in hopes of appealing to more attorneys.

Additionally, the commission unanimously approved the first reading of an ordinance that would rezone some of the properties in the extraterritorial zone around the city. The ETZ expanded in 2011 and 2015 and several of those properties had previously been zoned by Stark County for single-family residential uses and were platted as residential subdivisions, according to a report compiled by county planner Steve Josephson.

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Some of these areas now appear to be zoned as agricultural areas. The North Dakota Century Code states that there needs to be a zoning transition meeting to take place before the city adopts an ordinance exercising extraterritorial zoning, but no such records have been found, according to the report. Josephson recommended the city take a look at some of those subdivisions to ensure they are zoned correctly.

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