ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

DPD reminds citizens to obey 48-hour parking ordinance on public streets

It's time to clear the streets, and not just of snow. The Dickinson Police Department has been actively enforcing a 48-hour parking ordinance on public streets this winter in an attempt to make it easier for snow removal. However, not all are hap...

2248329+0108 Parking Ordinance 2.jpg
A vehicle sits parked with a violation sticker Thursday on a Dickinson street. (Andrew Wernette/The Dickinson Press)

It’s time to clear the streets, and not just of snow.

The Dickinson Police Department has been actively enforcing a 48-hour parking ordinance on public streets this winter in an attempt to make it easier for snow removal.

However, not all are happy this is the case.

A thread on a popular area Facebook group recently garnered more than 50 comments from locals about their dissatisfaction with the ordinance. Some wrote that they initially weren’t aware of the increased police action during winter months, while others stated they simply disagreed with the ordinance.

However, Sgt. Dave Wallace of the police department said it’s a necessary measure.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Kind of one of those things that has to be done, unfortunately,” Wallace said.

Officers often use snow on a vehicle to ascertain whether it has been moved or not within the time period, he said.

“In one night, they went out and issued 176 parking tickets,” he said, which occurred last weekend.

Wallace said the number is not that unusual. When a heavy snow comes though, Wallace said officers will often use the opportunity to go out and inspect large numbers of vehicles on public streets for those that remain covered after a two-day period.

Once determined as an offender, Wallace said the officer will adhere an orange sticker informing the vehicle’s owner that they face the possibility of the vehicle being impounded if not moved within 48 hours, along with a ticket.

While the ease of snow removal on public streets is a main reason for enforcing the ordinance, Wallace said police also are on the lookout for abandoned vehicles. On occasion, he said officers come across stolen vehicles as well.

He reminded the public that the department does not enforce the measure in private parking lots or apartment parking lots. The same goes for the Heartland Village trailer park south of Villard Street, he said.

Wallace said if people feel they have a good reason for not moving their vehicles in a timely manner, they can call the police department to ask for an extension to their time limit. Otherwise, he advised citizens to follow the ordinance.

What To Read Next
With HB 1205, Reps Mike Lefor and Vicky Steiner would prohibit "sexually explicit content" in public libraries. Facing an uphill battle, the pair remain united in their commitment to see it passed.
The North Dakota Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.
City accountant reports increases in oil impact, sales tax, hospitality tax and occupancy tax revenue during the Jan. 24 meeting, commission approves two policy amendments.
Testimony to the top House committee from a convicted attendee of the Jan. 6 rally focused on the "inhumane" treatment of Jan. 6 defendants. The committee rejected a resolution on the matter 12-0.