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Fargo High Rise will be knocked down, land to east will be redeveloped

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Special to The Forum
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FARGO — A downtown skyline landmark here will be knocked down and, combined with a building project planned just to its east, the two moves could significantly reshape Fargo's eastern gateway for those entering the city from Moorhead.

The 22-story Lashkowitz High Rise can't be fixed and will be torn down, Steve Eickhoff, capital improvement coordinator for the Fargo Housing and Redevelopment Authority, told the city's Planning Commission on Tuesday, April 2.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which oversees the building, "wants protection for the tenants so that they have somewhere to go and we aren't just putting 248 people out on the street," Eickhoff said. Most of the High Rise tenants are elderly or disabled.

That dynamic is also why Fargo's Housing and Redevelopment Authority is one of three entities interested in developing a city-owned piece of property at the intersection of Main Avenue and Second Street, which was cleared of a large apartment complex in recent years to allow room for a flood-control project along Second Street. That area is just east of the High Rise.

All three development proposals for the site along Main Avenue and Second Street call for a mixed-use building with residential and commercial space.

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Special to The Forum

photo 2 - 04-02-2019_planning_commission_packet-120.jpg
Special to The Forum

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