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Farmers market moves to downtown Dickinson location

The Roughrider Homegrowers Farmers Market is kicking off its season in a new location. The farmers market, which has been located at the Dickinson Charities Bingo parking lot, has moved to downtown Dickinson this year. Kristi Schwartz, president ...

The Roughrider Homegrowers Farmers Market is kicking off its season in a new location.

The farmers market, which has been located at the Dickinson Charities Bingo parking lot, has moved to downtown Dickinson this year.

Kristi Schwartz, president of the Downtown Dickinson Association, said the association has been interested in having the farmers market at a downtown location for a few years.

"It's part of our efforts to try to revitalize downtown Dickinson and the more activities and things we can have downtown the better that's going to help to get more people to the downtown area" she said. "We knew it would be good for downtown."

Chris Kleinwaechter, secretary and treasurer with the farmers market said the new location will improve their visibility.

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The farmers market will be located on the corner of Sims Street and Villard Street and will be open at 10 a.m. on Saturdays and Tuesdays through October.

Kleinwaechter suggests showing up between 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. to get the best variety of items.

Throughout the season, Kleinwaechter said there would also be events so people can shop, enjoy activities or eat lunch at one of the food trucks that will be there.

Around 12 vendors will set up shop to sell their goods that can vary from garden produce, jam, jelly, baked goods, crafts and hot beverages.

Karen Weiler-who has a booth where she sells coffee, hot chocolate and tea-participated for the first time last year after a hiatus.

Over 30 years ago she and her mother brought produce they collected to sell at the farmers market.

As her mother got older, she took a break from attending, but decided to bring Organo Gold coffee to the farmers market to gauge interest.

"I just kind of thought it wouldn't do as well until people knew that I was there," she said.

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But Weiler said she figured out that "everybody loves coffee."

"It went really well," she added. "I was very pleased."

Not only did it go well but Weiler realized she enjoys selling coffee to people.

"It took me 60 years to figure out what I love and it's being a barista," Weiler said with a chuckle.

Kleinwaechter has been involved with the farmers market for the past seven years and she said it feels like all of the vendors become a family.

While some of the vendors sell their items as a hobby, Kleinwaechter said others do it as a source of income.

She said it's incredibly time consuming but it's always fun to come together every season.

"It's a fun place to hang out, get recipes, get ideas and gardening tips," she said. "We don't have any big secrets."

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Kleinwaechter also wants people that come out to share what's working well for them and said vendors will be more than willing to help with any questions people may have.

"If you have anything that's working great please share and we'll share too," she said.

Related Topics: DICKINSON
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