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Honda to recall about 650,000 Odyssey minivans in U.S.

DETROIT--Honda Motor Co. said on Thursday, Dec. 29, it will recall nearly 650,000 Odyssey minivans in the United States covering 2011 to 2016 model years because second-row seats may not lock in the event of a crash.

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A man is reflected on a window at Honda Motor's showroom in Tokyo, Japan, May 13, 2016. REUTERS/Toru Hanai/File Photo

DETROIT-Honda Motor Co. said on Thursday, Dec. 29, it will recall nearly 650,000 Odyssey minivans in the United States covering 2011 to 2016 model years because second-row seats may not lock in the event of a crash.

No injuries or crashes have been reported related to this issue, Honda's U.S. division said.

Two separate recalls will be conducted, Honda and U.S. safety regulators said. The largest involves 634,000 Odyssey minivans for model year 2011 to 2016, and a smaller one affects about 7,600 of the 2016 model year Odyssey minivans.

Many fewer minivans will be recalled in Canada and Mexico, but Honda did not immediately have details on the number of vehicles involved.

In each of the recalls, the second row of seats may not lock in the event of a crash in certain conditions, U.S. regulators from the National Highway Traffic Administration and Honda said.

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Owners in the larger recall will be notified by letter in mid-February. The parts to fix this issue will not be available until the spring, Honda said.

In the smaller recall, Honda said it will notify owners in late January.

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