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How have things transpired with the Dakota Access Pipeline?

o June 25, 2014: Energy Transfer Partners announces it has enough commitments from shippers to move forward with an oil pipeline from the Bakken to Patoka, Ill. The announcement came on the heels of Gov. Jack Dalrymple's Pipeline Summit at a time...

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Protestors of the Dakota Access Pipeline site on Lake Oahe celebrate a Friday, Sept. 9, 2016, announcement that the Army promises to "reconsider any of its previous decisions" regarding the site north of Cannon Ball, N.D.Michael Vosburg / Forum News Service

• June 25, 2014: Energy Transfer Partners announces it has enough commitments from shippers to move forward with an oil pipeline from the Bakken to Patoka, Ill. The announcement came on the heels of Gov. Jack Dalrymple's Pipeline Summit at a time when nearly two-thirds of Bakken crude was being transported by rail.

• Dec. 22, 2014: Dakota Access LLC submits an application to the North Dakota Public Service Commission for a pipeline route permit.

• May 28, 2015: Public Service Commission holds a public hearing in Mandan on the proposal, the first of three public hearings held in North Dakota cities along the pipeline route.

• Jan. 20, 2016: Public Service Commission grants permit for Dakota Access. Approval was also needed by public utility boards in South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois.

• Jan. 25, 2016: Construction begins in North Dakota on six oil terminals for the Dakota Access project. Pipeline construction begins in mid-May.

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• April 2016: Standing Rock Sioux Tribe members begin the Sacred Stone Camp near the confluence of the Cannonball and Missouri rivers in opposition of the pipeline.

• July 25, 2016: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issues a permit for Dakota Access water crossings, including authorizing the Lake Oahe crossing north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. An easement for the Lake Oahe crossing is not granted at this time.

• July 27, 2016: Standing Rock Sioux Tribe files a lawsuit in federal court in Washington, D.C., against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, arguing the agency failed to properly consult with the tribe and violated the National Historic Preservation Act and other laws.

• Aug. 11, 2016: Protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline begin to ramp up near Cannon Ball, N.D., with the first 10 arrests. Thousands have since joined the camp and dozens of arrests - including for trespass and felony reckless endangerment - have been made in connection with protest activities.

• Sept. 3, 2016: Pipeline opponents and security personnel with dogs and pepper spray clash after Dakota Access bulldozes an area the tribe claims contains burial sites. The incident, including whether sacred sites were destroyed, is under investigation.

• Sept. 9, 2016: A federal judge denies the tribe's request for an injunction that would halt pipeline construction. But minutes later, federal agencies announce the Corps will not authorize construction under or near Lake Oahe until further review.

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