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Letter -- Let's slow down the boat a bit

To the editor: The more I read about Ordinance 1351, the more difficulty I have with it. The way it's worded, if it passes, we'll never again get to vote on the multi-million dollar projects the city proposes. Instead, the city commissioners will...

To the editor:

The more I read about Ordinance 1351, the more difficulty I have with it. The way it's worded, if it passes, we'll never again get to vote on the multi-million dollar projects the city proposes.

Instead, the city commissioners will pick, choose and implement whatever they want, when they want. Does that seem right?

As it is now, we the residents of Dickinson, vote on whether we want to finance a specific multi-million dollar project. We have a say in the matter.

If we pass Ordinance 1351, we lose that say. From then on, your pocketbook is in the hands of the city commission; it's all up to them what they want to buy with your money.

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Don't speak up later about overtaxation; speak up now by voting no on June 10. Later is just too late.

I'm concerned about the massive expenditure of our tax dollars and our city going further into debt, while the country's economy teeters. The only reason we aren't experiencing economic woes here is because of the local oil boom.

What happens, though, if we don't get rain this spring? Cropland is the driest it's been in decades. What effect would all this have on our beef industry and on Main Street and on the rest of us?

Let's slow the boat down and pay off the community center before we start up any more multi-million dollar projects. That's good sound economics that our city ought to practice once in awhile.

Vote no on June 10 and send a message to the commissioners that they get no blank checks from the voters of Dickinson. Some of us in this town still believe in government by the people.

William Wolff

Dickinson

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