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ND universities could shed almost 500 jobs; NDSU may cut university studies program

FARGO--Administrators at North Dakota State University are considering axing the university studies program as part of their budget paring under plans taking shape for 2017-19.

File photo. (The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead)

FARGO-Administrators at North Dakota State University are considering axing the university studies program as part of their budget paring under plans taking shape for 2017-19.

The possible elimination of the university studies program, which would mean transferring students to other programs or departments, is among the list of possible academic program eliminations that have been presented to the North Dakota University System.

The state university system has compiled plans from the 11 public campuses calling for the elimination of about 490 positions, assuming a budget that has been reduced by 10 percent.

Of the 490, 190 positions are vacant, 125 would be eliminated through early retirements and about 125 would be eliminated through layoffs, according to figures presented by Tammy Dolan, the university system's chief financial officer.

The equivalent of about 70 positions would come from reducing contracts or hours worked by part-time workers. The university system employs the equivalent of 6,591 full-time faculty and staff on the 11 state campuses.

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"This is just a plan and it's a planning process," Dolan said Monday, Sept. 19. "Nothing is set in stone."

Each campus is offering some program involving buyouts or early retirement offers, she said.

Plans will evolve and be modified once the North Dakota Legislature convenes in January and the revenue picture clarifies, Dolan said.

Patrick Springer first joined The Forum in 1985. He covers a wide range of subjects including health care, energy and population trends. Email address: pspringer@forumcomm.com
Phone: 701-367-5294
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