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Nebraska town citizens pay taxes on property to keep white supremacist Cobb out

RED CLOUD, Neb. -- A resident of Red Cloud, Neb., expressed relief that white supremacist Craig Cobb won't be moving in after private citizens put up the money to pay taxes on property Cobb wanted in town.

RED CLOUD, Neb. -- A resident of Red Cloud, Neb., expressed relief that white supremacist Craig Cobb won't be moving in after private citizens put up the money to pay taxes on property Cobb wanted in town.

Webster County Attorney Sarah Bockstadter said she cancelled a court hearing Monday to confirm the sale to Cobb because persons with a legal interest in the properties had come to the courthouse to redeem the property by paying the back taxes. Cobb had stopped by the courthouse late last summer and made payments of $125 for two properties in Red Cloud and another $3,400 for a property in nearby Inavale, Neb.

The tax redemptions that were paid up in the meantime knocked Cobb out of the running. Bockstadter said Cobb will get his money back, plus interest.

Mike Goebel, of Red Cloud, was vocal about not wanting Cobb, or any of his neo-Nazi racists in town and attended a town hall meeting where a decision was made to raise the tax money after Cobb put down a $3,500 payment on three properties that were scheduled for a sheriff's sale.

“It’s a big relief that he’s not moving here or moving people in here. We’ve got bigger and better things to do,” said Goebel, who also criticized Cobb’s probation officer for allowing him to travel into their state.

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Cobb's four-year probation started in April 2014 and he is meanwhile living Sherwood, near Canada. He tried to buy property in nearby Antler, but residents there put up money to buy the property and keep him out of town. He was jailed in 2013 on charges of terrorizing on an armed patrol of Leith, in Grant County, where he tried to take over the town government for other white supremacists.

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