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North Dakota

A political committee funded by North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum has paid for an advertising blitz in support of candidates trying to unseat incumbent Republican lawmakers, including House Appropriations Chairman Jeff Delzer.
A Ford Explorer was driven into a washed out area on a rural gravel road.
State spill investigation manager Bill Suess told Forum News Service the recent heavy rain and snowfall means the river is running fast and at a high volume, so the fertilizer will likely dilute in the water.
The price for regular unleaded fuel reached a record high average in Fargo on Wednesday, while the statewide highs in Minnesota and North Dakota

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Michael Standaert, who most recently was employed as a correspondent based in China with the Bloomberg Industry Group, was hired by North Dakota News Cooperative to work on in-depth stories for newspapers in the state.
David Cook had his first day on the job at NDSU after the departure of Dean Bresciani.
The eight-member Board of Higher Education oversees the North Dakota University System, which encompasses 11 public universities and colleges including North Dakota State University and the University of North Dakota.
The Jim Hill Middle School in Minot, Rolla School in Rolla and Solen School in Solen each won DON'T QUIT! fitness centers worth $100,000.
After spending more than $3.2 million on political donations during the 2020 election cycle, campaign finance records filed last week indicate Republican Gov. Doug Burgum is making moves to be a major political donor again in 2022.
Women seeking abortions in North Dakota would have to find other options if, as expected, Roe v. Wade is overturned.

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Legislative expense reports show Sen. Ray Holmberg of Grand Forks spent more than $125,000 on travel over the last decade, far exceeding the average for lawmakers.
Energy Transfer on Thursday, May 12, filed a petition for rehearing, stating that the state's highest court "overlooked and/or misapprehended" certain facts of the case and the law.
A Pew study found that North Dakota's rainy day fund would keep state government going for 115 days, but a legislative leader cautions that state budgets must last for 730 days.

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