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North Dakota man drove to meet Kylie Jenner, broke into wrong home, restraining order says

Court docs: Justin Bergquist broke into the wrong home, told officers he was "there for Kylie."

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Sisters Kendall Jenner (left) and Kylie Jenner attend a 2016 NBA game between the Sacramento Kings and the Los Angeles Lakers at Staples Center in Los Angeles. Kirby Lee / USA TODAY Sports
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LOS ANGELES — Media personality Kylie Jenner has been granted a restraining order against a North Dakota man accused of breaking into the wrong home while trying to meet her.

A California judge authorized the restraining order on Wednesday, Dec. 30, for the “Keeping Up With The Kardashians” star. Jenner filed a civil harassment petition on Dec. 4 against Justin Robert Bergquist, a 22-year-old who, according to North Dakota court records, is from Bismarck.

The restraining order lasts for a year, according to court documents obtained by The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead.

Jenner's petition and other documents detailed an alleged burglary in which Bergquist allegedly broke into the wrong home. He jumped over a fence the evening of Nov. 19 and entered a house, but he fled after finding a young child in a playroom, according to a Los Angeles Count Sheriff's Department report.

The house Bergquist allegedly broke into was in the same cul-de-sac as Jenner’s home in Hidden Hills, a gated community in Los Angeles County, court documents said.

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Another report from a security firm said Bergquist drove up to the gate of the community several hours later in a 2005 Chevy Impala, which had North Dakota plates. He told a security guard he drove from North Dakota to see Kylie Jenner, claiming he previously spoke with Jenner, the report said.

“I have no relationship with Mr. Bergquist and have never met or communicated with Mr. Bergquist," Jenner said in her petition. "There is absolutely no reason or legitimate purpose for him to be contacting me or coming to my home.”

The security report alleged he wanted to "run the gate" and "asked how 'strong' " it was. He was then arrested by deputies.

Authorities used surveillance footage to identify Bergquist, the report said.

In her petition, Jenner also said she keeps the address of her home private, adding she feared for hers and her child’s safety.

Bergquist was charged with felony burglary after the incident but was released on bond Dec. 1, according to court documents. A preliminary hearing for the criminal case is scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 7.

Bergquist had no felonies on his record in North Dakota before the alleged burglary, but he was cited in December on suspicion of disorderly conduct and driving without a valid license in McLean County. He also faces a misdemeanor simple assault charge in Bismarck stemming from a Dec. 15 incident.

The Forum reached out to Bergquist, but a woman who answered the phone said he was unavailable. A message left for Jenner's attorney was not returned Thursday.

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Jenner is an American celebrity who owns Kylie Cosmetics. The 23-year-old socialite and media personality has more than 206 million followers on Instagram.

April Baumgarten joined The Forum in February 2019 as an investigative reporter. She grew up on a ranch 10 miles southeast of Belfield, N.D., where her family raises Hereford cattle. She double majored in communications and history/political science at the University of Jamestown, N.D.
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