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North Dakota Republican governor candidate makes campaign stop at Dakota Diner

Caramel rolls were in abundance as well as Doug Burgum pins, stickers and yard signs at Dickinson's Dakota Diner on Wednesday morning. Burgum is hitting the campaign trail for governor all the way up to the election next Tuesday. While a diner ma...

Doug Burgum speaks to a group of potential voters in Dickinson on Wednesday morning at the Dakota Diner. (Press Photo by Kalsey Stults)
Doug Burgum speaks to a group of potential voters in Dickinson on Wednesday morning at the Dakota Diner. (Press Photo by Kalsey Stults)

Caramel rolls were in abundance as well as Doug Burgum pins, stickers and yard signs at Dickinson's Dakota Diner on Wednesday morning.

Burgum is hitting the campaign trail for governor all the way up to the election next Tuesday.

While a diner may have seemed like an odd choice to raise awareness for the Fargo businessman and entrepreneur to secure voters for the North Dakota Republican Party's governor nomination, Burgum said he enjoys meeting and talking to people in intimate settings. He said he has been traveling across the state to every town with more than 1,000 people to speak at events like this, and has put more than 16,000 miles on his campaign bus.

"I love doing this," he said. "I think you can see people are frustrated with some of the institutions of government and they want someone to listen and someone who is willing to get out on the ground and listen to what they have to say. North Dakotans are wonderful, beautiful people who care about this state and you can tell how much these people care."

In the crowd, Dickinson City Commission candidate Sarah Jennings and Stark County Commission candidate Leslie Ross offered their support.

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"I'm happy to be here and happy to support Doug," Ross said. "The reason I want to support Doug is because I, like you (the audience), am really kind of tired of the status quo."

Burgum mentioned during his speech the recent endorsement of former North Dakota Gov. Ed Schafer.

Schafer, who is the interim president for the University of North Dakota, told Forum News Service he likes the business background that Burgum would bring to the governor's office.

Burgum grew Great Plains Software, based in Fargo, with money that he used from his family farm into a successful software company that was acquired by Microsoft in 2001 for $1.1 billion.

During his speech at the Dakota Diner, Burgum mentioned how he was involved in the revitalization in downtown Fargo that has helped turn around the once-slumming area and has drawn younger, more vibrant crowds. Fargo's downtown, in turn, is in the process of being emulated by many North Dakota cities-including Dickinson.

"To have a great state we have to build great communities," he said.

Doug Burgum held a meet and greet at the Dakota Diner in Dickinson on Wednesday morning during his governor campaign tour that all leads to elections on Tuesday. (Press Photo by Kalsey Stults)
Doug Burgum held a meet and greet at the Dakota Diner in Dickinson on Wednesday morning during his governor campaign tour that all leads to elections on Tuesday. (Press Photo by Kalsey Stults)

Related Topics: DOUG BURGUMDICKINSON
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