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4,000 pounds of fertilizer spill into river in southwest North Dakota

State spill investigation manager Bill Suess told Forum News Service the recent heavy rain and snowfall means the river is running fast and at a high volume, so the fertilizer will likely dilute in the water.

Missouri River
The Missouri River
File photo
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BISMARCK — About 4,000 pounds of fertilizer spilled into the Heart River in Grant County on Tuesday, May 17.

South Dakota-based Agtegra Cooperative reported to the North Dakota on Tuesday that a vehicle accident resulted in dry nitrogen-packed urea fertilizer spilling into the river about 18 miles southeast of Glen Ullin, according to a news release from the state Division of Water Quality.

Spill investigation manager Bill Suess told Forum News Service recent heavy rain and snowfall means the river is running fast and at a high volume, so the fertilizer will likely dilute in the water.

The Heart River is not a drinking source, but it flows into the Missouri River near Mandan. Suess said the fertilizer will likely be so diluted when it reaches the Missouri that it won't affect drinking water quality. He added that people recreating in the Heart and Missouri rivers should not be concerned about the fertilizer spill.

Suess said he didn't know any more details about the vehicle accident leading to the spill.

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The Division of Water Quality will take water samples from the rivers and continue monitoring remediation efforts, Suess said.

Jeremy Turley is a Bismarck-based reporter for Forum News Service, which provides news coverage to publications owned by Forum Communications Company.
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