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'Not a small difference, but a large one' Dickinson event honors local veterans

Four North Dakota veterans and a first responder recognized with an early Christmas gift of $5,000 each in Dickinson Friday.

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Veteran George Petermann receives a check for $5,000 courtesy of the Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota and an anonymous donor.
Photo by James B. Miller, Jr. / The Dickinson Press
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Dickinson — Dickinson Memorial Park sits atop a hill and pays homage to the men and women who have served their country as members of the United States Military. The beautifully decorated park consists of 12 acres of land and is home to the Bandshell and Stark County Veterans Pavilion and Memorial. It was at the Pavilion and Memorial that four veterans and a first responder were recognized for their service and sacrifice by being the recipients of a surprise donation of $5,000.

The donation was made possible through the Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota and an anonymous donor.

“This event was put on to recognize the veterans and the first responder for their service to this community and their country,” Roger Kadrmas, Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota, said. “The anonymous donor has requested to remain that way, but I can say that he is a veteran and he personally wanted to make a difference in the lives of his fellow veterans. Not a small difference, but a large one.”

Veterans George Petermann, Tessa Hogan, Joseph Yellowhammer, and first responder Joe Wanner were the recipients honored. A fifth veteran was honored but unable to attend the event.

In attendance for the surprise were a handful of the beneficiary’s friends and family, along with representatives of the Dickinson Fire Department, Stark County and Dunn County Sheriff’s Offices.

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American Legion Matthew Brew Post 3 veterans attend event where four area veterans and a first responder received an early Christmas gift in Dickinson on Friday, Dec. 2, 2022.
Photo by James B. Miller, Jr. / The Dickinson Press

Among those in attendance was Dave Weiler, of The Wall of Honor, who confirmed that each of the veterans would be additionally honored with inclusion in the Wall of Honor.

The Wall of Honor salutes local heroes across the state of North Dakota by paying tribute to them on digital indoor billboards located in restaurants, Veteran's service and fraternal organizations, c-stores, banks, credit unions, hotel lobbies, schools, airports, casinos and taverns.

Speaking to The Press, Weiler said he was honored to see local veterans receive such a courteous and deserving donation for their service.

“We have 125 locations around the state and we honor veterans and first responders. We were asked by Roger Kadrmas and the anonymous donor to be present to make sure that these five people who have sacrificed for our community and country are honored with being placed up on the wall,” he said, noting that each of the veterans would be placed on the Wall of Honor following the event.

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Roger Kadrmas with the Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota presents checks for $5,000 to veterans in a ceremony at Memorial Park's Veterans Pavilion and Memorial.
Photo by James B. Miller, Jr. / The Dickinson Press

Weiler also confirmed that the Wall of Honor is working on installing two new displays in Dickinson at Dickinson High School and the Stark County Courthouse, to accompany the displays located at Dickinson Eagles Club, Dickinson St. Anthony’s Club and Trinity High School.

Kadrmas thanked all the veterans and their families, and spoke briefly about the Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota.

“Our organization is made up of North Dakota citizens who provide hunting and fishing opportunities to military personnel who have been injured in the line of duty. We do this with the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s generosity by providing 10 deer licenses each year, and with the Theodore Roosevelt National Park’s South Unit who allow us to assist with culling cow elk with veterans,” Kadrmas said. “The Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota assists veterans by providing lodging, a place to hunt, travel expenses and assistance before, during and after the hunt. Our Hunts not only show our appreciation for everything these men and women have done for the country, but also help in the recovery process.”

For more information about the Injured Military Wildlife Project of North Dakota visit their website at imwpnd.com/

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Four North Dakota veterans and a first responder received an early Christmas gift in Dickinson.
Photo by James B. Miller, Jr. / The Dickinson Press

Related Topics: DICKINSONVETERANSEVENTS
James B. Miller, Jr. is the Editor of The Dickinson Press in Dickinson, North Dakota. He strives to bring community-driven, professional and hyper-local focused news coverage of southwest North Dakota.
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