ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Oversen named woman of the year by coalition

GRAND FORKS -- A Grand Forks legislator has been named woman of the year by the North Dakota Women's Network for her work on women's issues in her political career.

GRAND FORKS - A Grand Forks legislator has been named woman of the year by the North Dakota Women’s Network for her work on women’s issues in her political career.
“It was quite a shock. I certainly didn't expect it,” said Rep. Kylie Oversen, a Democrat who represents District 42 near the University of North Dakota campus.
Formed in 2006, the Women’s Network is an advocate for women on matters such as political participation, equal opportunity and pay, access to birth control, women’s health and other issues.
Oversen was chosen because of her accomplishments since first getting elected to the Legislature in 2012, according to board member Melissa Jillett. The group considers political activity and work in areas such as reproductive rights, women’s safety and economic prosperity.
“We saw in her a woman from a small town in North Dakota … putting herself out there,” she said.
Originally from Killdeer, Oversen was UND student body president and is now a law student at UND.
Oversen cited women’s issues as an important part of her work in 2013.
“Reproductive rights were the forefront of our last legislative session,” she said. “My committee was the one that heard all of those bills, and I was one of only three women on that committee, so I thought it was really important to bring a young woman’s perspective to those issues, somebody who hasn’t had children yet but hopes to.”
Several anti-abortion bills in the last Legislature proved controversial during the session and led to legal challenges.
Oversen plans to work on economic issues in the next legislative session, which starts in January.
The Women’s Network has scheduled an award presentation for Oversen in Bismarck on Sept. 20.

What To Read Next
Neil Joseph Pfeifer was released Friday, Feb. 3, on $5,000 cash bail.
State lawmakers hear from both sides as parents and educators weigh in on the potential impact of the bill
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
Stark County prosecutors prepare for pretrial conferences and jury trials scheduled for March