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Press Pass: A humbling comedown, New England and Regent seek to combine ambulance districts, Sickler signs with U-Mary

Here's some of our top stories from Thursday's edition. It's your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts. In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown [[{"type":"...

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Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts. In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown
Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014. The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom. But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now. New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help. Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election. “I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.” Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills. Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch. The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R. North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day. North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp. Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts. In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014. The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom. But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now. New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts
Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help. Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election. “I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.” Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills. Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch. The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R. North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day. North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp. Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts. In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014. The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom. But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now. New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help. Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election. “I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.” Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study
Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills. Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch. The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R. North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day. North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp. Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts. In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014. The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom. But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now. New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help. Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election. “I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.” Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills. Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch. The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R. North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon
A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day. North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp. Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts. In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014. The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom. But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now. New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help. Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election. “I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.” Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills. Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch. The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R. North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day. North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp. Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary
Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts.In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown
Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014.The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom.But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now.New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help.Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election.“I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.”Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills.Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch.The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R.North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day.North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp.Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts.In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014.The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom.But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now.New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts
Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help.Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election.“I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.”Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills.Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch.The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R.North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day.North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp.Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts.In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014.The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom.But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now.New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help.Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election.“I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.”Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study
Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills.Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch.The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R.North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day.North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp.Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts.In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014.The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom.But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now.New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help.Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election.“I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.”Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills.Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch.The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R.North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon
A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day.North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp.Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539177","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.Here’s some of our top stories from Thursday’s edition. It’s your Press Pass to some of the best stories we bring you every day. Want your Press Pass fast? Sign up for our email alerts.In North Dakota's Oil Patch, a humbling comedown[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539173","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Dave Van Assche didn't fret too much when oil prices started to slide in late 2014.The postal services business he had built over three short years was thriving, catering to the tens of thousands of people who, like him, had streamed into North Dakota to strike it rich during an unprecedented oil boom.But the price drop quickened, due in part to a supply glut from the 1.2 million barrels of oil North Dakota was pumping each day. Within a year, oil prices were down more than 70 percent, and North Dakota's oil rush stalled. The daily take at Van Assche's business has sunk from a peak of $2,500 to at best $600 now.New England, Regent seek to combine ambulance districts[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539174","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Ambulances are often called upon to help people. But in Hettinger County, two ambulance services are asking for the people’s help.Ambulance squad leaders in New England and Regent are seeking their communities’ votes for a combined ambulance district during the June 14 election.“I guess the biggest reason I am doing this for Regent is because the state department said there are seven to 10 ambulance services in the state that are real close to closing their doors,” said Terry Hartman, squad leader for the Regent Ambulance Service. “We don’t want to see that in our community, so that’s why we are trying to get other funding to stay alive.”Tribal members question water quality in response to new Bakken study[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539175","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]Some residents of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation say they want greater monitoring of their drinking water to detect contamination from oil-related spills.Tribal members raised concerns Wednesday during a community event that featured a Duke University researcher who recently studied the impact of wastewater spills in North Dakota’s Oil Patch.The study, which found widespread soil and water contamination from brine spills, reinforces the need for better monitoring of water quality, said Joletta Bird Bear, interim president of the grassroots group Fort Berthold P.O.W.E.R.North Dakota Army National Guard presentation featured at annual Armed Forces Day luncheon[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"2539176","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","title":"","width":"180"}}]]A crowd of Dickinson citizens, including several U.S. military veterans, gathered for an annual luncheon Wednesday at the Ramada Grand Dakota Hotel to commemorate Armed Forces Day.North Dakota Army National Guard Col. Jonathan J. Erickson, the state Guard’s training and operations officer, was the featured speaker at the event hosted by the Dickinson Rotary Club with support from the Dickinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Steffes Corp.Dickinson Trinity’s Sickler signs with U-Mary
Alanna Sickler’s opportunity to play college basketball came as no surprise to Dickinson Trinity’s coaches. But Sickler had to convince herself that she could compete beyond high school. That process met its end this week as the Titans senior forward signed a letter of intent on Monday to continue her playing career at the University of Mary in Bismarck.

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