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Second night of Trump protests shut down Interstate 94

MINNEAPOLIS--Hundreds of marchers protesting the election of Donald Trump as president shut down Interstate 94 on Thursday night in Minneapolis. An estimated 1,000 people initially gathered outside the Humphrey School of Public Affairs on the Uni...

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Interstate 94 was shut down in Minneapolis on Thursday night as demonstrators protesting the presidential election of Donald Trump flooded onto the freeway. Photo by Pioneer Press: Nick Woltman

MINNEAPOLIS-Hundreds of marchers protesting the election of Donald Trump as president shut down Interstate 94 on Thursday night in Minneapolis.

An estimated 1,000 people initially gathered outside the Humphrey School of Public Affairs on the University of Minnesota's West Bank campus Thursday night.

Shortly before 8 p.m., marchers made their way onto I-94 at Riverside Avenue. Police blocked freeway traffic in both directions.

The Minnesota Department of Transportation said the shutdown affected all lanes between Hennepin Avenue and Huron Boulevard.

Traffic was still blocked as of 9 p.m.

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The march marked the second straight day of demonstrations in the Twin Cities and across the country, following the Republican Trump's upset victory over Democrat Hillary Clinton on Tuesday.

About 300 protesters marched through the streets of St. Paul on Wednesday night.

The U demonstration was organized on Facebook by a group called Socialist Alternative Minnesota, and endorsed by several local activist groups, according to the event page.

More than 3,400 Facebook users RSVP'd to the event.

The crowd began marching south about 6:30 p.m. and was at Cedar Avenue and Sixth Street at 7 p.m. By about 7:45, the marchers made their way onto the freeway at Riverside.

Nationally, demonstrators in both red and blue states hit the streets for a second day to express their outrage over Trump's unexpected victory.

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