ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Stack is the new city utilities manager

Gregory Stack is the new City of Dickinson utilities manager. The role combines two previous positions: water reclamation manager and water utilities manager. Water utilities has expanded to include waste water collections, water distribution, an...

Gregory Stack is the new city utilities manager. The role combines two positions in the public works department. Stack has been with the City of Dickinson since 2016. (Brandon L. Summers / The Dickinson Press)
Gregory Stack is the new city utilities manager. The role combines two positions in the public works department. Stack has been with the City of Dickinson since 2016. (Brandon L. Summers / The Dickinson Press)

Gregory Stack is the new City of Dickinson utilities manager.

The role combines two previous positions: water reclamation manager and water utilities manager.

Water utilities has expanded to include waste water collections, water distribution, and

industrial waste and storm water control.

The water reclamation facility is the city's waste water treatment plant.

ADVERTISEMENT

Bringing together two roles "makes sense," Stack said.

"From a perspective of overall management, it's something that's in my wheelhouse," he said. "It makes sense to bring the two different departments together into one."

Stack has been in this profession for more than 40 years.

He has a bachelor's degree from Arizona State University in environmental technology management, and previously worked for Phoenix, Arizona, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and in Lennox, South Dakota.

Stack has been with the City of Dickinson since January 2016, starting as water reclamation facility manager.

He was then promoted to water utilities manager to oversee the water utilities portion of the city's public works department.

Stack officially began his role as utilities manager in February, but has been serving as interim since September.

Stack is not daunted by taking on the combined roles.

ADVERTISEMENT

"I gave a little bit of advice to the previous water utilities manager that was here before, on what he should be looking for and so on," he said. "I fully understand the system, and its complexities and its nuances."

Stack praised Dickinson's water distribution system.

The city does not treat its own water, Stack noted. The water comes from Southwest Water Authority.

"From the water distribution side, we've added several water towers in the last few years," he said. "We've added infrastructure, and we've maintained and replaced old water mains, as needed."

The city has also gone through the process of modeling its system for expansion in different areas, Stack said.

"We're ready if we need to expand again, but we also have an idea of what we need to do to go ahead and maintain and upgrade our facility," he said.

Being city utilities manager is exciting for Stack, as he enjoys matters of both infrastructure and management.

"Being able to manage it and maintain it is the critical thing," he said. "We can build all we want, but we need to keep it up to par."

Related Topics: CITY OF DICKINSON
What To Read Next
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
Stark County prosecutors prepare for pretrial conferences and jury trials scheduled for March
The investigation is ongoing.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.