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Two accused of delivering drugs make initial court appearance

Two men accused of conspiracy to deliver and delivery of heroin made their initial appearance in Southwest District Court on Monday afternoon in Dickinson.

Two men accused of conspiracy to deliver and delivery of heroin made their initial appearance in Southwest District Court on Monday afternoon in Dickinson.

Dustin Iverson, 25 of Dickinson, has been charged with delivery of a controlled substance-heroin, conspiracy to deliver a controlled substance-heroin, both Class B felonies, as well as reckless endangerment and aggravated assault, both Class C felonies.

According to court documents Iverson allegedly "created a substantial risk of serious bodily injury to another individual under circumstances manifesting his extreme indifference to the value of human life" when he allegedly "delivered heroin to an unnamed individual and he subsequently overdosed on heroin."

Roy Askew, 59 of Dickinson, has been charged with conspiracy to deliver a controlled substance-heroin and delivery of a controlled substance-heroin, both Class B felonies.

A Class B felony has the maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and/or a $20,000 fine. A Class C felony carries a potential of five years in prison and/or a $10,000 fine.

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Stark County Assistant State's Attorney Amanda Engelstad requested that bond be set at $100,000 for both men due to a concern for public safety, that request was granted by Southwest District Court Judge William Herauf.

Herauf did not take a plea from the men on Monday as they are felony charges. Both men indicated they would be applying for court-appointed counsel.

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