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Weapons trial postponed for Watford City man linked to murder-for-hire case

BISMARCK - A federal judge here has postponed the trial of a Watford City man who faces felony weapons charges and is linked to a suspected murder-for-hire case in Washington state.

BISMARCK – A federal judge here has postponed the trial of a Watford City man who faces felony weapons charges and is linked to a suspected murder-for-hire case in Washington state.

James Terry Henrikson was indicted by a grand jury in January on seven counts of felon in possession of a firearm and one count of felon in possession of ammunition. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

A jury trial was originally scheduled to start next week in U.S. District Court in Bismarck. But Henrikson’s public defender filed a motion Wednesday to suppress evidence seized from a safe in Henrikson’s home when it was searched by authorities with a warrant on Jan. 20.

Authorities had to contact the safe’s manufacturer to get the combination, and only then did they find the firearms in the safe, the motion states.

District Judge Daniel Hovland issued an order Thursday postponing the trial to allow for a hearing and decision on Henrikson’s motion to suppress.

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Henrikson remains in federal custody without bail.

Henrikson’s estranged business partner, Doug Carlile, was found shot to death Dec. 15 in his Spokane, Wash., home. Timothy Suckow is charged with first-degree premeditated murder in Carlile’s death. Henrikson has not been charged in the case but is mentioned often in court documents.

According to those documents and testimony from an investigator at a court hearing in January, Carlile reportedly told one of his sons that if he disappeared or was killed, Henrikson would be responsible. An informant also told investigators he personally heard Henrikson threaten to kill Carlile and hurt his entire family, and authorities searching Suckow’s phone found Henrikson’s number in his contacts under “James ND.”

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