With the first week of June underway, temperatures in Dickinson and southwest North Dakota are expected to peak into the high 90s and low triple digits, as meteorologists predict a recording breaking temps.

Warning coordination meteorologist John Paul Martin of the Bismarck National Weather Service said that daily temperatures across the western and central regions of the state will rise each day.

“It’s a little early in June. Typically, we get into the end of the 90s in June. But it’s a little out of the ordinary so early in the month. This is the first week of June here and it looks like we’re going to be approaching 100 degrees,” Martin said.

In Dickinson, Martin is predicting that temperatures will break record highs on Thursday and Friday. The record high is 96 degrees for June 3, 1968 and the normal temperature for that day is 71 degrees. Currently, meteorologists are projecting a 94-degree day, so it will be close to the record high temperature.

On Friday, Martin said they are predicting a high of 98 degrees that will potentially break the 93 degree record set in 1988, which was one of the worst years for drought in the state. The normal temperature for June 4 is 72 degrees.

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From the 1-3 inches of precipitation, the latest drought monitor has improved for portions of Stark, Dunn and Hettinger counties from a D3-extreme drought to a D2-severe drought, Martin noted. However, the drought conditions in the region from Lake Sakakawea to Minot worsened, and are at D4-exceptional drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor website.

“So it’s a small area, but it was a good thing. Now the question is: is it going to hold there? Are you going to keep getting some timely rains, so that it holds there or is it going to dry out again and worsen?” Martin said. “.. With temperatures in teh 90s and near 100 degrees and very low humidity, there’s going to be a lot of evaporation taking place off of the ground. So I suspect sometime in June, (Stark County will) worsen back to where it was at D3.”

As temperatures creep into the 90s, Martin encourages people to not leave children in a locked vehicle, especially infants.

“The temperature goes up to 120 to 130 degrees in the vehicle quite quickly. So number one, is the safety of the elderly and the safety of children. Make sure they have a fan or air conditioning; do not leave anybody in a car,” he said.

Pets should also be kept in mind and make sure they have plenty of water, especially if they are left outside for any period of time, Martin continued. People should also drink plenty of water while out in the sun and avoid drinking alcohol in the heat, he added.