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West Nile virus detected in bird in Grand Forks

GRAND FORKS -- A crow found in Grand Forks has tested positive for West Nile virus. The discovery has city leaders in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks urging residents to take precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes, which carry the virus...

GRAND FORKS -- A crow found in Grand Forks has tested positive for West Nile virus.

The discovery has city leaders in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks urging residents to take precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes, which carry the virus.

Both cities have announced plans to spray for mosquitoes tonight.

The mosquito most common for transmitting West Nile virus is the Culex tarsalis. This mosquito is most active just before sundown and throughout the night into the early morning hours.

Most people infected with the West Nile virus do not develop symptoms, but some do develop mild illness one to two weeks after exposure with symptoms such as fever, headache, body aches, skin rash and swollen lymph nodes.

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Grand Forks Mosquito Control operates as if the virus is always present and therefore will not be making major changes to the daily operations of mosquito control, according to a news release.

 

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