SUBSCRIBE NOW Just 99¢ for your first month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

A high fiber diet may help reduce antibiotic resistant infections

Your diet may become a way to fight antibiotic resistance. In this episode of News MD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out a study that shows eating a diverse diet that includes a lot of soluble fiber may result in fewer antibiotic-resistant microbes in your gut.

Foods with high soluble fiber
Eating foods high in soluble fiber may help reduce the number of antibiotic resistant microbes in your gut
Viv Williams
We are part of The Trust Project.

ROCHESTER — Resistance to antibiotics, such as tetracycline, is a worldwide problem. It can happen when microbes in your gut learn to survive antibiotics.

In a study from the USDA Agricultural Research Service, researchers found that a diverse diet that includes higher levels of soluble fiber and lower levels of protein, especially from beef and pork, is linked to lower levels of antimicrobial resistance genes in people's gut microbes.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water. It's found in foods such as oats, beans, lentils, peas, chia seeds, nuts carrots, berries and broccoli.

“The results lead directly to the idea that modifying the diet has the potential to be a new weapon in the fight against antimicrobial resistance," says Dr. Danielle Lemay with the ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center in Davis, California, and leader of the study. "And we’re not talking about eating some exotic diet either, but a diverse diet, adequate in fiber, that some Americans already eat.”

The researchers say more study is needed to find out how nutrition may help reduce levels of antibiotic-resistance.

ADVERTISEMENT

The study is published in the journal mBio .

Health_Fusion-1400x1400.jpg

Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
A whiff of the sweet smells of springtime are a seasonal joy. But the pollen-filled air also may send people with allergies running to their medicine cabinets. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams gets tips on how to handle seasonal allergies from asthma and allergy specialist.

What to read next
Both Sanford Health and Essentia Health in Fargo report more inquiries from new mothers about breastfeeding.
Fentanyl has taken root in Montana and in communities across the Mountain West during the pandemic, after formerly being prevalent mostly east of the Mississippi River, said Keith Humphreys of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the North American Opioid Crisis. Montana law enforcement officials have intercepted record numbers of pale-blue pills made to look like prescription opioids such as OxyContin. Nationwide, at least 103,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2021, a 45% increase from 2019, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 7 of every 10 of those deaths were from synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl.
Over time, Dr. Leslie Keeley’s injection became known as the “Gold Cure,” named for its supposed content. Later analysis cast doubt on the idea that gold was used at all, but a foundational principal of Keeley's treatment centers continues today, in programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous.
Research about the health benefits of nature and greenery keeps coming. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out a new study that shows increasing the amount of urban greenspace could have prevented thousands of deaths.