BISMARCK — The North Dakota Department of Health on Tuesday, July 7, announced the death of four North Dakotans from COVID-19 and another 52 new cases.

Despite the new cases, the number of currently infected residents actually fell Tuesday with 63 newly recovered patients.

There are now 401 residents of the state known to be infected with the illness. North Dakota's pandemic-high number of active cases came May 21, when 670 residents were infected.

The department says three people from Cass County with underlying health conditions died from the illness. A woman in her 80s from Stutsman County also died. These four deaths reported in one day come after a review into death records found they were not previously reported to the state.

About 2.6% of the 1,989 test results announced Tuesday came back positive.

Sixteen of the new cases came from Burleigh County, which encompasses Bismarck. The county has the most known active cases in the state at 124 and has been growing as a hotspot for the illness over the last several weeks.

Eight of the new cases came from Cass County, which includes Fargo and West Fargo. Of the 2,351 residents who once had the illness in the county, 111 are currently infected.

The other 28 new cases Tuesday came from Barnes, Benson, Cavalier, Sargent, Sioux, Stark, Towner, Walsh, Ward and Williams counties.

Medical professionals listed COVID-19 as the official cause of death for 72 of the state's victims. Eleven were determined to have died primarily because of another condition while infected with COVID-19, and one death record is still pending.

Gov. Doug Burgum said the state has the capacity to perform 5,000 tests per day, and he has urged residents to seek testing whether they have symptoms or not. The state has put on free mass testing events in the state's biggest metro areas for about a month.

A total of 3,898 North Dakota residents have tested positive, but 3,413 have recovered. There are 24 residents hospitalized with the illness.

The state has announced the results of 204,526 tests, but some residents have been tested more than once.

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