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BROCK: Protesters could learn from Martin Luther King Jr. teachings

Donald Trump did not receive a majority of the popular vote but won enough Electoral College votes to be elected president. This is not the first time it has happened and unless the law is changed to use the popular vote it may not be the last time.

Harvey Brock

Donald Trump did not receive a majority of the popular vote but won enough Electoral College votes to be elected president. This is not the first time it has happened and unless the law is changed to use the popular vote it may not be the last time.

His opponent Hillary Clinton conceded the election because she knew how the process works and recognized that Trump had gathered enough Electoral College votes to win.

Trump did what is required by law to become president and Clinton conceded the election because that is how our democracy works, I'm sure if the roles were reversed and she had lost the popular vote but won the electoral college vote she would have be spending her time preparing to be president.

This was the most contentious election from the start to the finish that I have ever seen but despite that Donald Trump couldn't have been more gracious talking about his opponent after she had conceded. Thousands of people have since taken to the streets to protest the election of Trump.

We in North Dakota until recently seemed to have been immune to such major protests that now seem to happen daily as a result of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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Americans are guaranteed the right to protest by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution which prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, ensuring that there is no prohibition on the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble, or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances.

The keywords are peaceably assemble and nowhere are acts of violence protected by the Bill of Rights or any other law. Protesters who break the laws should expect to be arrested and some do.

Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. understood the power of non-violent protest and changed a nation with civil disobedience, peaceful protests, registering people to vote and relying on the courts. Many of King's followers were arrested for breaking unjust civil rights laws and despite being beaten did it while turning the other cheek.

There were other groups in King's time day seeking to eliminate discrimination and used tactics similar to some of today's protesters and were largely unsuccessful.

King knew that the only way to gain public support and orchestrate change was to do it through non-violent protest something today's protesters would do well to emulate.

Related Topics: ELECTION 2016
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