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Brock: Thank you Crosby for a great weekend

Last week, I attended the North Dakota Newspaper Association's annual convention held in Crosby, whose city website describes them as a town located in Divide County, approximately 35 miles east of the Montana Border and 6 miles south of the Cana...

Last week, I attended the North Dakota Newspaper Association’s annual convention held in Crosby, whose city website describes them as a town located in Divide County, approximately 35 miles east of the Montana Border and 6 miles south of the Canadian border. Crosby is the Divide County seat with a population of 1,300.
I left Dickinson and four hours later left U.S. Highway 85 in the middle of nowhere and, after a short drive on state Highway 52, arrived to a town that is far smaller than usual city convention sites. I have to admit to some doubts about how many people would show up to a convention being held in such a small town and, quite honestly, a long way from anything. Attendance was down from some conventions held in the past, but those who stayed home for whatever reason missed out on a great convention. The program focused on Pulitzer Prize winners and was, by far, the best I’ve ever attended in my 10 years as a member of the NDNA. The Republican governor debate was interesting and fun to moderate. The new Andrist Community Center, Guardian Inn and The Bypass restaurant and Lounge worked really nice for our meetings, plus the food was outstanding. That said, the best thing about the convention was the reception we received. Crosby made me feel really welcome from the moment I pulled into town. Several signs, including even one on the Assembly of God Church, welcomed convention members. Crosby is a typical small western North Dakotan town where you seldom passed anyone who doesn’t wave. The pride folks have in their community was obvious from just walking around town.Most every home was neatly painted, yards were free of junk and mowed. Apparently no one wanted to be that neighbor with dandelions in their yard. Improvements were being made to the county’s courthouse, streets and the outdoor pool. One of our meetings was held at the historic Dakota Theatre, which was saved from extinction in 2000 when it was purchased and renovated by Crosby Meadowlark Arts Council. While out on morning walks, I couldn’t help but think Crosby like many small cities. Families gathered to worship at church, cheer local youth teams, looked forward to holidays, the county fair and the annual threshing bee. It’s where folks know way more about their neighbors than those who live in larger cities, and parents keep an eye out for their own kids and others. Like many small towns, Crosby teenagers can’t wait to grow up so they can move to a larger town and those that do later pray for a way to return home when they have kids of their own. Thank you to the people of Crosby for making our 2016 NDNA convention a huge success and also for reminding me of how nice it is to spend time in a great small town. Brock is the publisher of The Press and vice president of the North Dakota Newspaper Association board of directors. Contact him at hbrock@thedickinsonpress.com or 701-456-1201.Last week, I attended the North Dakota Newspaper Association’s annual convention held in Crosby, whose city website describes them as a town located in Divide County, approximately 35 miles east of the Montana Border and 6 miles south of the Canadian border. Crosby is the Divide County seat with a population of 1,300.
I left Dickinson and four hours later left U.S. Highway 85 in the middle of nowhere and, after a short drive on state Highway 52, arrived to a town that is far smaller than usual city convention sites. I have to admit to some doubts about how many people would show up to a convention being held in such a small town and, quite honestly, a long way from anything. Attendance was down from some conventions held in the past, but those who stayed home for whatever reason missed out on a great convention. The program focused on Pulitzer Prize winners and was, by far, the best I’ve ever attended in my 10 years as a member of the NDNA. The Republican governor debate was interesting and fun to moderate. The new Andrist Community Center, Guardian Inn and The Bypass restaurant and Lounge worked really nice for our meetings, plus the food was outstanding. That said, the best thing about the convention was the reception we received. Crosby made me feel really welcome from the moment I pulled into town. Several signs, including even one on the Assembly of God Church, welcomed convention members. Crosby is a typical small western North Dakotan town where you seldom passed anyone who doesn’t wave. The pride folks have in their community was obvious from just walking around town.Most every home was neatly painted, yards were free of junk and mowed. Apparently no one wanted to be that neighbor with dandelions in their yard. Improvements were being made to the county’s courthouse, streets and the outdoor pool. One of our meetings was held at the historic Dakota Theatre, which was saved from extinction in 2000 when it was purchased and renovated by Crosby Meadowlark Arts Council. While out on morning walks, I couldn’t help but think Crosby like many small cities. Families gathered to worship at church, cheer local youth teams, looked forward to holidays, the county fair and the annual threshing bee. It’s where folks know way more about their neighbors than those who live in larger cities, and parents keep an eye out for their own kids and others. Like many small towns, Crosby teenagers can’t wait to grow up so they can move to a larger town and those that do later pray for a way to return home when they have kids of their own. Thank you to the people of Crosby for making our 2016 NDNA convention a huge success and also for reminding me of how nice it is to spend time in a great small town. Brock is the publisher of The Press and vice president of the North Dakota Newspaper Association board of directors. Contact him at hbrock@thedickinsonpress.com or 701-456-1201.

Related Topics: CROSBY
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