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Brock: What I do to celebrate the Fourth of July

Tomorrow we will celebrate our nation's 240th independence anniversary. Personally, I will fly my American flag like I do 365 days a year and, as Bill Maher once said, it is the least I can do. No really, it is the least a person can do. Like eve...

Tomorrow we will celebrate our nation’s 240th independence anniversary. Personally, I will fly my American flag like I do 365 days a year and, as Bill Maher once said, it is the least I can do. No really, it is the least a person can do.
Like every day, I will be thankful that whether to fly the flag or not is my decision only and thanks to the First Amendment, people can even burn the flag if they choose. Just not my flag.
Later in the day, I plan to take a drive through Theodore Roosevelt National Park, which always reminds me of what our country was like 240 years ago when only the first people of America lived here.
Sitting in my air-conditioned car, meandering my way through the park on the paved road, I try to imagine what the first Europeans thought when they saw the wide-open expanse of the Badlands.
I marvel at the moxie of the first people and the pioneers who carved out an existence and prospered in such a rugged land. Somewhere along the way, I will think of the president whose heartbreak was cured by the solitude of this land that now is a national park that bears his name.
Tomorrow evening, while many in the rest of the world struggle to find enough food to eat, I will fire up the grill and cook an abundance of food. No matter how undercooked or overcooked I do it, it’ll be second to none thanks to the world’s greatest agricultural producers.
After sundown, the sky over Dickinson will light up with fireworks and the sound of rockets that will last long after the official show is over at the rodeo grounds.
Unlike Francis Scott Key did on the night of Sept. 13, 1814, during the War of 1812, I will fall asleep despite the sounds of rockets. Sleep will come easy knowing that the flag outside my front door will still be there when I wake up July 5, because of the American soldiers standing guard around the world protecting the freedom we take so often for granted.
Every Independence Day, I’m reminded of the miracle that was the birth of our country and the many blessings that we enjoy as Americans.
Every four years we elect a president and this year, the Republican candidate is running on a platform of making America great again.
I know there are many problems and I wish whoever is elected success in fixing those problems, but our nation will always be the greatest country in the world, largely because of our democracy that we celebrate the Fourth of July.

Related Topics: DICKINSON
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